Folk by Zoe Gilbert

IMG_2671On a remote and unforgiving island lies a village unlike any other: Neverness, Folk is a collection of tales  circling the lives of one generation, those coming of age.  Every year they gather, while the girls shoot their arrows and the boys hunt them out. In other tales a girl is snatched by a water bull and dragged to his lair, a babe is born with a wing for an arm and children ask their fortunes of an oracle ox. While the villagers live out their own tales, enchantment always lurks, blighting and blessing in equal measure.

Judging from the blurb this was so far up my street it’s practically my house!I was champing at the bit to read it! But then I put it down halfway through and just couldn’t talk myself into picking it up again.

Gilbert builds a sinister atmosphere better than most, every tale I read was dark and dank with a primitive sinuousness. However, the characters were too primitive, each seemed to be out only for themselves – believable, as they were teens, but tedious to read. Characters that care only for themselves are difficult to care for.

Gilbert’s skills as a writer means I will look at whatever she produces next, but I’m not so sure I would jump up and snatch it so quickly.

3 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews.

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock by Imogen Hermes Gowar

IMG_2690“One September evening in 1785, the merchant Jonah Hancock hears urgent knocking on his front door. One of his captains is waiting eagerly on the step. He has sold Jonah’s ship for what appears to be a mermaid.”

The blurb of this book really doesn’t give much away… so let me correct that for you (without spoilers of course!)

When widowed merchant Jonah Hancock takes possession of a mermaid he suddenly finds himself thrust into the world of high society pleasure seekers. He becomes obsessed with an innocent looking girl at the famous Mrs Chappell’s house, but Angelica is in love with another and won’t even look at him unless he finds her a mermaid too.

We follow Angelica and Jonah through their highs and lows as they get closer and drift apart again as they discover the true meaning of love, forget it and try to remember it again, whilst trying to find a permanent place within the privilege and pomp of London society.

I waited an age to read this book and then I almost gave up halfway through. For me, believable characters are key and there was something not hanging together for me in Angelica’s character – I couldn’t quite believe her. But I decided to give it another 30 pages and suddenly there was a piece of information that made Angelica click with me. Then her character began to grow and the twist began which made for absorbing reading.

I’m glad I persevered, the second half of the book was masterful, but if Angelica’s character had been revealed a little earlier I would have loved the whole thing.

3.5 Bites

 

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Moonstone: The Boy Who Never Was by Sjón

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Rotherweird by Andrew Caldecott

IMG_2676The town of Rotherweird was cast adrift from the rest of England by Elizabeth I. Now it stands alone – there are no guidebooks, and only a few from the outside are ever allowed in.

Despite this it is not a town that has stood still, there are fascinating and diverse architectural styles cramming the narrow streets, avant garde science and offbeat customs. One such custom is that nobody is allowed to study the town or its history.

But suddenly two outsiders arrive, they are quite unconnected – Jonah Oblong has been hired to replace the modern history teacher (who seemingly broke the rules about studying local history), and the sinister billionaire Sir Veronal Slickstone, who has somehow got permission to renovate the town’s long-derelict Manor House.

Both are keen to connect past and present, but this draws them into a race against time and each other with possibly apocalyptic consequences.

I wanted to love this, I put off reading it for a while as an act of delayed gratification. And to begin with I did love it. The main character is likeable enough and Rotherweird is a wonderful world.

But soon after we arrive there the cast of characters take over and sadly it becomes a confusing mess. As interesting as all the characters are, we are jumped into one head after another and far too  quickly. I felt dizzy and confused and had no idea what was going on. Eventually I gave up on it before I was even half way through.

Three Bites.

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews.

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Impossible Views of the World by Lucy Ives

IMG_2564Stella Krakus is a curator at Manhattan’s renowned Central Museum of Art and is having the roughest week. Her soon-to-be ex-husband is stalking her and a workplace romance with “a fascinating, hyper-rational narcissist” is in free fall. But then a beloved colleague, Paul, goes missing and it seems strange things are afoot.

The appearance of a mysterious map, depicting a 19th-century utopian settlement, sends Stella hunting to discover the truth. What  links a haunting poem, several unusual novels, a counterfeiting scheme, and one of the museum’s colorful early benefactors? Can she discover the unbearable secret that Paul’s been keeping?  It won’t be easy with all the distractions around her – she unwittingly stars in a viral video that’s making the rounds and the museums current exhibit is sponsored by a Belgian multinational that wants to take over the world’s water supply.

It is almost unbearably hipster New York. Almost. Luckily there’s enough salty humour in here and enough old money New York to save it and I ended up liking Stella quite a lot and wanted to know what would happen.

Unfortunately the ending left me feeling a little ‘what was the point’ and I do think this book missed a couple of great opportunities. Still a pleasant enough way to spend a few hours and I’ll look out for her next book.

3 Bites.

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews.

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Those Left Behind by Various

One of the greatest (superficial) disappointments of my life was the cancellation of the TV series Firefly written by Joss Whedon. It was a a space western drama series set in 2517 and concerned the lives of the 9 crew members of the Firefly Class spaceship ‘Serenity’ and even though that description makes it sound a little lame, I absolutely loved it. As did millions of ‘Browncoats’ across the world. Sadly this wasn’t enough for the studio, and they cancelled the series after only 11 of the 14 episodes produced were broadcast. You could argue for days about whose fault it was (*cough*foxnetwork*cough*) but the millions of fans were left with no closure on any of the story lines.
Three years later, fan pressure had led to feature film being made and Serenity was released in part to wrap up the plot threads left hanging by the cancellation of Firefly.

We fans are never satisfied however and continue to want moremoremore! We were rewarded for our nagging and petulant whinging with a series of graphic novels to full in yet more gaps in the story lines!

TLBThose Left Behind by Brett Matthews, Joss Whedon and Will Conrad (artist) was the first of these and dealt with a couple of significant plot points. I won’t delve into the story because of the eternal battle waged against spoilers- I’m urging you all to rush out and watch Firefly so I certainly don’t want to ruin it for you!

The artwork in this graphic novel is good, the characters all look like they are supposed to and Conrad does a decent job of capturing the space cowboy vibe of the TV series. Story wise, this is a child of the TV series more than the film i.e. more crime than moral obligation but it rockets on at a good pace whilst still managing to explore the interpersonal relationships of the crew.

The script work/dialogue fit in with the established canon of the film and TV and it occasionally feels like an episode of the TV series. For example, in times of high emotion, the characters slip into Chinese in the same manner as on the screen. It’s familiar and conforting to feel like you really are reading about what went on in between the series and the film.

It’s absolutely not one to be reading without having seen the TV series first and frankly, if you aren’t a fan of Firefly (I can’t believe this is the case but…) then there is nothing here for you.

I however am a huge fan so I really enjoyed this!

3.5 bites

Rachel Brazil
Although well-known amongst my family for my habit of falling asleep with a book on my face, I’ve not let the constant face bruises deter me from indulging in my favourite pastime. There is no famine, only feast, in my house with every flavour of book available for consumption. I’m happy to sample almost anything from the smorgasbord of literature available but can always be tempted with a juicy murder mystery or sweet little romance.

The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy

Arundhati Roy had a huge success with her first book back in 1997, it won the Booker Prize and the love of the nation as it stayed on the bestseller list for month after month.But since then she has remained frustratingly silent. So hearing a second book from her was finally about to be published the literary world was spun into a frenzy!

The sneak peeks of the cover and the blurb encouraged the frenzy – here’s the blurb “The Ministry of Utmost Happiness takes us on a journey of many years – the story spools outwards from the cramped neighbourhoods of Old Delhi into the burgeoning new metropolis and beyond, to the Valley of Kashmir and the forests of Central India, where war is peace and peace is war, and where, from time to time, ‘normalcy’ is declared.

Anjum, who used to be Aftab, unrolls a threadbare carpet in a city graveyard that she calls home. A baby appears quite suddenly on a pavement, a little after midnight, in a crib of litter. The enigmatic S. Tilottama is as much of a presence as she is an absence in the lives of the three men who loved her.”

Unfortunately it just doesn’t live up to the hype. The characters are all extraordinary and deeply interesting and the book itself is more like a collection of short stories woven together. But as interesting as the characters and the stories are, the writing lets them down. Roy fails to create an emotional resonance, there is plenty of description and a great sense of setting but she doesn’t spend enough time describing how the characters feel and what they want.

Sadly it’s only 3 Bites from me and an admission that I left half the book on my plate.

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince by JK Rowling

IMG_1643We are fast approaching the 26th June, which is officially the 20th (!!) anniversary of the publication of Harry Potter and The Philosopher’s Stone. And our fond review of the series is coming towards the end as well. We have made it to the penultimate book, Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince, and once again we have turned to fellow fans to give their feedback. Why not join in the conversation and let us know what you thought! Warning: spoilers below!

This book certainly seemed to polarise the people we spoke to. “I didn’t love Half Blood Prince. It felt like something I had to get to the end of just because I needed to know what happened,” said Clare.
“I thought It was all too angsty,” said Rachel. “I know that was the point of it, but it reminded me too much of stroppy teenager stuff that I’d experienced or seen. I suspect I wouldn’t have minded if I had been an actual teenager.”

Heather disagreed, seeing the angst instead as further demonstration of Harry’s growing maturity. “He is battling with his contending feelings of isolation and fondness for his friends,” she said. “This book is pivotal to the series and supplies an intense and dramatic read.”

“It’s definitely more of a grown up book than the rest of the series, but that makes sense seen as though Harry and co are in their 6th year at Hogwarts,” said Lauren. “I though it was a rollercoaster of a read; will Draco survive, let alone complete his mission? I couldn’t read it fast enough to find out! I finished the book having been through so many emotions I was exhausted but in a good way.”

“This is my favourite book of the series for a number of reasons,” said Claire. “For me it was a coming of age book, bringing together the whole reason for the tale. Harry finally realises what his destiny is and what he must do. He finds out exactly how Voldemort has bemuse so powerful and what a huge task it will be to find and destroy the horcuxes, finally defeating him. It also has the heartbreaking moments when Dumbledore dies, killed by Harry’s perceived enemy Snape, who turns out to be the eponymous half blood prince. I remember reading that passage twice as I couldn’t quite believe that Dumbledore was dead. I found this to be the most gripping book of the series, but unfortunately the biggest let down of the film franchise!”

Fan’s average: 4 Bites

Kelly Turner
My love of reading began at an early age. I am indebted to my parents for putting "Naughty Amelia Jane" by Enid Blyton in the loft when I was five, forcing me to read something else. At the age of sixteen I picked up my first Discworld novel and never looked back. As well as devouring anything by Terry Pratchett I am also a fan of other fantasy writers such as Neil Gaiman and Ben Aaronovitch. In addition I like to read historical fiction, and enjoy a love story or two.

One Of Us Is Lying by Karen McManus

cover106249-mediumThe Young Adult thriller is becoming a respected genre, and there shouldn’t be anything surprising about that. After all passions run high in teen years and sometimes those passions run over sense.

This book is great for fans of The Breakfast Club, Pretty Little Liars and 13 Reasons Why.

One afternoon, five students walk into detention, but only four walk out. Those that walk out are Bronwyn a Yale-bound good girl, Addy, the picture-perfect homecoming princess, Nate, the bad boy and Cooper, the jock. So far so stereotypical.

Simon, the one that dies, is an outcast and the creator of their school’s notorious gossip app. Only, Simon never makes it out of that classroom.

It seems like his death wasn’t an accident, he’d planned to post juicy reveals about the four he was sharing detention with. Should they be suspects in his murder. Or are they just the perfect patsies for a killer who’s still on the loose?

I must admit most of the reason I read this book was because the publicity department was so full on about it. I got a free review copy and I left reading it until just a couple of weeks ago. I love The Breakfast club and quite enjoyed Pretty Little Liars but this seemed a little to generic for my taste.

Was I right? Yes and no. At first glance the characters are all a little stereotypical; but as their secrets are uncovered there are surprising depths to them. And the plot also has some surprising twists and turns.

Once I started it I found it hard to put down, it has that thing that good thrillers have where you think you know what’s going on but it keeps throwing curveballs so you want to get to the end quickly to prove yourself right. Or is that just me? Anyway I was right!

It isn’t the most highbrow read but it is pacy and has a good moral centre.

3.5 Bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Long Earth by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter

13147230._UY475_SS475_Considering I am such a vocal fan of Terry Pratchett, it’s odd that it has taken me such a long time to get to this book. I think that I am saving each book of his, like a fussy collector. Anxious about reading them because I know that for each one I start, there will be one less Terry Pratchett book which I will ever read for the first time. It’s hard knowing that his publications are finite. But then you fall upon a line which could only have been written by Sir Terry, and it sings from the page.

In a future not too distant from our present, Earth is a very different place. In fact, it is many different places. Following the events of what has come to be known as Step Day, humans have discovered that parallel versions of Earth exist just a step away from the original, or Datum Earth as it is now known. Using a device called a Stepper, invented by missing physicist Willis Linsay, humans can move to Earths east or west of Datum, into the Long Earth and unclaimed territory just like the pioneers of the old west.

For Joshua Valiente, stepping isn’t just about discovery. It is a form of escape. Like millions of children across the world, he made his own Stepper on Step Day, before the world knew what the device did and what the ramifications would be. Finding himself in another world, he saved the lives of nearby children who found themselves in the same situation. But Joshua discovered he could step without his Stepper. Fifteen years later and only a handful of people know his secret: Madison Police Officer Jansson who found Joshua wondering the streets of Datum Earth on Step Day, and is now investigating Long Earth crimes within the area which would be Madison on the Datum; and Lobsang, a legally sentient computer who happens to be the reincarnation of a Tibetan motorcycle repairman. And Lobsang has a proposition for Joshua: to join him aboard his stepping airship called the Mark Twain and travel further through the Long Earth than anyone has before.

This is a fun collaboration between Pratchett and Stephen Baxter, and the first in a five book series. Like all good Sci Fi and Fantasy fiction, complex themes are considered within the book, such as overpopulation, individuality and Homo Sapian’s need to explore and discover. Disappointingly, I found the middle of the book dragged a little. As Joshua and Lobsang step across countless Earths there is period where not much happens, but towards the final third the tension starts to ramp up a little. I found some of the characters reactions a little unrealistic at times, with conversations seeming to move from calm and considered, to angry in the space of a sentence. But overall I found the concept interesting and the characters fascinating enough to keep me gripped. The fact that I was up in the air whilst reading it added to this. Not aboard the Mark Twain and stepping across the Long Earth however, just on a bog standard Ryanair flight. Still, it’s a start.

3 Bites.

Kelly Turner
My love of reading began at an early age. I am indebted to my parents for putting "Naughty Amelia Jane" by Enid Blyton in the loft when I was five, forcing me to read something else. At the age of sixteen I picked up my first Discworld novel and never looked back. As well as devouring anything by Terry Pratchett I am also a fan of other fantasy writers such as Neil Gaiman and Ben Aaronovitch. In addition I like to read historical fiction, and enjoy a love story or two.

Anne Boleyn: A King’s Obsession by Alison Weir

51EkMKM92DL._AC_UL320_SR208,320_I’m going to start this review with a little warning: I am making a gross assumption that everyone knows the story of Anne Boleyn, so there are a few spoilers within the next 500 words. If you aren’t aware of her history, this book is a fairly good place to start, but you might not want to read much further. You have been warned!

There is something about Anne Boleyn that has held our attention for nearly 500 years. Part of it is the mystery that surrounds her. As Alison Weir writes in her author’s notes at the end of this book, there are not many surviving examples of Anne’s own letters. What we know about her comes from the words of others, whose opinions of her were none too favourable. In this book, Weir gives her a voice.

There is a lot of history to pack in, especially when the author is as well versed as Weir is. The book begins with an eleven year old Anne being offered a place in the household of Margaret, Regent of the Netherlands. Unfortunately, because there is so much to fit in, most of the book seems to skip from one event to the next. There is no time to draw breath, no time to really develop much more than a two dimensional understanding of the characters.

We are informed constantly of Anne’s dislike of adultery, she shuns the advances of Thomas Wyatt, not wishing to become his mistress. She harbours a hatred for the King for denying her marriage with Harry Percy. There is no mention of a desire for power or fame before Henry begins to make his advances, and as such it seems like a different Anne Boleyn who decides that she wants to be queen more than she wants to marry for love.

Hints are dropped early with Henry Norris making her “heart jolt” from the moment she sees him and Anne being aware of the good looks of her brother. Despite knowing Anne’s fate, there was still a big part of me that hoped things might end differently. But it wasn’t to be. Alison Weir is excellent at the emotional parts. I could feel Anne’s heartbreak and fear with each miscarriage. And once Anne is arrested on charges of high treason, time and the writing seem to slow down. Emotions run high and the last part of the book goes into the depth and description that were missing throughout the rest.

Alison Weir says she wanted to portray Anne as “flawed, but very human”, and she does this well. Anne is progressive, has been influenced by strong female leaders such as Margaret of Austria and Marguerite of Valois. In some ways she is ahead of her time: keen to shape the kingdom and assist with state matters in a very obvious way. Any book on Anne Boleyn is going to rely on the author’s own interpretation, but this one, based on many years of study, is an interesting portrayal.

3 Bites

This book is the second in Alison Weir’s Six Tudor Queen series. Kathryn of Aragon: The True Queen is out in paperback now. I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in return for an honest review. The Book Eaters always give honest reviews.

 

Kelly Turner
My love of reading began at an early age. I am indebted to my parents for putting "Naughty Amelia Jane" by Enid Blyton in the loft when I was five, forcing me to read something else. At the age of sixteen I picked up my first Discworld novel and never looked back. As well as devouring anything by Terry Pratchett I am also a fan of other fantasy writers such as Neil Gaiman and Ben Aaronovitch. In addition I like to read historical fiction, and enjoy a love story or two.

The Wild Air by Rebecca Mascull

IMG_2419Della Dobbs is the dull and plain one in the family, her oldest sister has successfully married and the middle sister is an actress, her younger brother is the apple of her father’s eye. She isn’t pretty or talented and the only thing she really enjoys is racing and fixing her bicycle. Then her Great Auntie Betty comes home to Cleethorpe’s from Kitty Hawk, North Carolina full of tales of the Wright Brothers and their incredible flying machines. Della is fascinated and develops a burning ambition to fly. Betty is determined to help her.

Can she overcome the Edwardian attitudes to women and learn to fly? And if she does will she be any good at it?

I really wanted to love this book. Full disclosure I’m working on a similar book and so I have a genuine passion for the amazing women that just did not take no for an answer. And let’s be clear, aeroplanes were little more than balsa wood, canvas and wire so anybody flying them was incredible.

But I couldn’t love it, I wanted to connect with the characters but the writing, though not terrible, was not good enough. The characterisations were ok but not absorbing, the plot and storyline were ok, the research was well done and the descriptions of flight were good.  But in the end there were too many information dumps and I almost gave up on it because of that.

3 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Witchfinder’s Sister by Beth Underdown

31377300The year is 1645, and as the Civil War continues to rage, Alice Hopkins is making her way from London to her hometown of Manningtree. Newly widowed and in the early stages of pregnancy, Alice has nothing to keep her in London. With her mother’s recent death, all that awaits her in Manningtree is her brother, Matthew. Accidentally burned by a careless wet nurse as a baby, Matthew was always a serious child. Although they were close as children, Matthew didn’t approve of his sister’s marriage and she fears what kind of welcome she will receive.

She discovers that her hometown has changed in the time she has been away. Matthew has risen in importance within the local community, and has become one of the leading voices in the detection of witches. Alice soon discovers that this prominence doesn’t just extend as far as the borders of the town, but into the rest of East Anglia.

As Matthew further investigates the women of Manningtree, so he also delves deeper into his own past. Having found his childhood wet nurse, he becomes convinced of her innocence in his accident. His blame shifts then to Bridget, a former servant, friend of his mother and mother in law to Alice. Alice herself is driven by a desire to protect her unborn child, her mother in law and her brother from the man that he has become.

It’s impossible to know what made a man like Matthew Hopkins act as he did. Beth Underdown paints him as a serial killer, a “killer of women,” which increases the discomfort and threat surrounding his vulnerable sister from who’s view point this story is told. I just wish there had been more of it. I found the first half of the book engaging, but felt that the second half fell a little flat and wanted there to be a little more depth to the characters. The same could be said for the secondary characters: the women who were accused, the female servants who assisted Hopkins- both willingly and unwillingly. I wanted to know more about them.

The dialogue and description plant us firmly in the 17th century, and works really well. I felt Alice’s loneliness and thought Underdown did a great job of showing us that aspect of her. She also shows us how evil can hide in plain sight, and how quickly it can become part of the zeitgeist. An important lesson in our modern world.

3 bites

Kelly Turner
My love of reading began at an early age. I am indebted to my parents for putting "Naughty Amelia Jane" by Enid Blyton in the loft when I was five, forcing me to read something else. At the age of sixteen I picked up my first Discworld novel and never looked back. As well as devouring anything by Terry Pratchett I am also a fan of other fantasy writers such as Neil Gaiman and Ben Aaronovitch. In addition I like to read historical fiction, and enjoy a love story or two.

The Moon and Sixpence by W. Somerset Maugham

IMG_2406This is the story of Charles Strickland as told by a writer who at first is an acquaintance of his wife.

When we first meet him he is a conventional stockbroker, but then out of the blue he abandons his wife and children to move to Paris and become a painter. Our narrator is sent to plead his wife’s case but finds a selfish, determined man who cares nothing for what anyone may think of him. Even of the few that think he is a genius. After learning all he can in Paris, his lack of money drives him to Tahiti, a country full of inspiration.

Our narrator catches up with his story there – finding that the tropics did little to soften his selfishness but everything to inspire his art.

This book is actually inspired by the life of Paul Gauguin, yeah the reference to Tahiti does rather give that away doesn’t it?! In some senses this does echo Gauguin’s life. He was a stockbroker for a time and did give it up to paint. But how close this is to the truth of Gauguin’s character I couldn’t say.

However the book does lampoon the automatic forgiveness of celebrity rudeness because genius’s can’t be expected to act like normal people! It does not close it’s satiric eye to the comedy of manners Edwardian society lived by either.

There is some sympathy in the book too, in Paris there is one person who recognises Stricklands genius and tries his best to support him, Stroeve. Although as a character he doesn’t escape mockery or misfortune, his generous nature shines through adding real warmth to this narrative.

It’s not an overly long book, a good one for taking on holiday overseas, read the London and Paris sections on the plane and enjoy the time in Tahiti on a beach somewhere!

3.5 Bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde

IMG_1612Thursday Next lives in an England very different from our own: The Crimean War has been raging for 131 years; Wales has seceded from the Union and has become the Socialist Republic of Wales; time travel is possible, and used by a specialist group called the ChronoGuards.

Thursday herself is a Crimean War vet whose father was a ChronoGuard before going rogue. Thursday works in The Special Operations Network (known as SpecOps), a series of policing departments who specialise in work too unusual to be handled by the regular force. Specifically, Thursday works in SpecOps-27, the literary division.

When the original copy of Martin Chuzzlewit is mysteriously stolen, Thursday is seconded to SpecOps-5 (a search and containment division) to assist. The suspect is Acheron Hades: notorious villain who can use the mere mention of his name to sense an enemy’s presence; who doesn’t appear on film or video; who can persuade people to do his bidding. Thursday knows him as her old English professor, which means she is one of the few people alive who know what he looks like. The only question is: what can he possibly want from the manuscript?

This is a world where words have power, where fictional characters can cross the borders and out of the book. This premise, plus the fact that the bulk of the story is set in my hometown of Swindon, meant this book seemed made for me!

There were parts I loved, such as the small little things which make this world different. I enjoyed how Thursday’s father would appear, freezing time around him so only Thursday could see him, and ask questions such as when and how the Duke of Wellington died (the answer is: shot by a French sniper during the opening exchanges of the Battle of Waterloo. This information makes Thursday’s father realise that the French revisionists have been involved.) I loved the passion people have for books. For example, the longstanding disagreements about who really wrote Shakespeare’s plays has created a group called the Baconians who aim to prove it was Sir Francis Bacon. It’s fun.

But there were things that frustrated me too. Firstly, the names. Amusing and silly to start with, I laughed at the name Paige Turner and Jack Schitt. But then it all got a little annoying, and Milton Keens and Landon Parke-Laine made me squirm.

I was also slightly put off by the character of Thursday. She’s strong and intelligent, which is great. But she feels a little cliched in places and definitely seems like a female character who was written by a man.

This is definitely a book with some enjoyable elements, but the annoyances built up which means I can only award it:
3 bites

Kelly Turner
My love of reading began at an early age. I am indebted to my parents for putting "Naughty Amelia Jane" by Enid Blyton in the loft when I was five, forcing me to read something else. At the age of sixteen I picked up my first Discworld novel and never looked back. As well as devouring anything by Terry Pratchett I am also a fan of other fantasy writers such as Neil Gaiman and Ben Aaronovitch. In addition I like to read historical fiction, and enjoy a love story or two.

The Other Einstein by Marie Benedict

imageAlbert wasn’t only Einstein that was quite bright. His first wife, Mileva “Mitza” Marić, was a brilliant physicist and a strong mathematician and her contributions to the special theory of relativity have been hotly debated for more than a century.

This book takes what is known about  her as it’s jumping off point. That she was considered unmarriageable because of her limp, that her father encouraged her to study, that in 1896, the extraordinarily gifted Mileva was the only woman studying physics at an elite school in Zürich. That she met and fell in love with  charismatic fellow student Albert Einstein there, that he promised her a bohemian lifestyle with them as equals in love and science. How Albert’s star quickly eclipsed her own regardless of this promise.

It is a fictionalised account, but a well-imagined one particularly when it comes to describing the time and places they lived. I have to be honest, I wasn’t quite so keen on the characterisations, somehow I didn’t feel they were authentic, particularly Mileva’s. Her desperation for love is understandable and I know it makes lunatics out of us all. I went through an emotionally abusive marriage so I even understand how if the most confident of women in an age when sexual equality is at least in site can be flummoxed then it was even more likely before women even had the vote. But she becomes so nuts over Albert so quickly – and it really is all the book is about for far too long. I found myself missing the character I’d first been introduced to.

As their marriage and working partnership decays the Albert Einstein we meet is very different from the man I’d always imagined him to be too. And because this is a fictional account I had problems with this, partly because I didn’t know what was true and what was not. But after I did some of my own research into it I felt even more uncomfortable. The premise and Albert’s character within this book is entirely possible, but there isn’t an awful lot in the way of evidence, by the end it felt like a character assassination. As a feminist I felt doubly uncomfortable- I want to support Mileva but these aren’t her words and may not be her truth. If they’d even been a thorough afterword clarifying what was evidenced, what was extrapolated and what was imagined I would have closed the book with the sense of having learned something, as it was I felt I’d been hoodwinked into jury service.

3 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Arthur C. Clarke’s 3001 – The Disappointing Final To A Confusing Odyssey

3001 The Final OdysseyI recently reread 3001 The Final Odyssey by Arthur C. Clark. I first read it many years ago and to be honest I can’t actually remember what I thought of it. This time around, seeing as I write the occasional review, I thought I would be more attentive to the story, style and setting.

First of all, I really ought to discuss where this book fits in. I’m sure you are aware of the film and book, 2001 A Space Odyssey – which you can think of as a joint project by Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrick. We are introduced to the mystery of the Monolith and the epic adventure and eventual transformation of Dave Bowman.

In the sequel, 2010 Odyssey Two, new characters are introduced and a further exploration of the mystery of the monolith. We meet Dave Bowman again, though briefly, and a Russian crew out to save the spaceship Discovery from the first film. We also learn why the computer, Hal 9000, murdered the crew. The story was written by Arthur C. Clark, the eventual film was directed by Peter Hyams. Both of which had the blessing of Stanley Kubrick.

Then comes the next book, 2061 Odyssey Three. The character of Haywood Floyd, who was introduced in the first book and features in the second, takes a trip to Halley’s comet. On the way, and after various mishaps, two people end up on Europa. At this point we discover there is indeed life there and it’s guarded by another monolith. This book does further the story somewhat and reveals more about the mysterious monolith and what happened to Dave Bowman and the ‘consciousness’ of the HAL 9000 computer.

After all of that, we end up with 3001 the Final Odyssey.

In this book, one of the original astronauts, Frank Poole, is found floating in space. Modern science has moved on somewhat and after a thousand years he is revived. He is then introduced to the new world of marvels with the help of Professor Anderson who revived him and Doctor Indra Wallace, later a romantic interest. And really, that’s where the book dwells. For a good three quarters of the story, we are following Frank Poole’s exploration and travels. It’s not until towards the end do find out more about Europa and the monolith. It seems rushed, and for me, ruined the mystery that was established with the first book. We find that Dave Bowman and Hal 9000 have become almost a single entity. We discover that behind the monolith’s are nothing more than just ‘aliens’ with an agenda – to act as Sheppard’s over civilisations and decide which is fit to continue. An old trope maybe but I kinda expected more.

When you’ve read all the books, it does seem like the final one is ‘out of joint’. However, if you are a fan of this series, then there’s something you should be aware of. From Wikipedia

Clarke consistently stated that each of the Odyssey novels takes place in its own separate parallel universe – this is demonstrated by the facts that the monoliths are still in existence at the end of 2010: Odyssey Two and that Floyd is no longer part of the trinity formed at the end of 2061: Odyssey Three. These parallel universes are a part of Clarke’s retroactive continuity.

We can take it then, that the series is not really a continuing story. Not if there are differences as cited above. If each individual story takes place in a ‘parallel universe’, are they related? If not, then they just happen to feature common characters, places and events. This revelation makes me feel really uncomfortable and very confused.

It doesn’t make sense to consider this book as a ‘standalone’ story, as you have to understand where the characters come from and their motivations. Also, to consider it as part of a series doesn’t make sense either. I guess I should just enjoy the story but the rush to the end, the disjointed nature of the series and slow plot line, it really should have been much better and so much more.

Bob Toovey
I started reading Sci Fi at around age 8, I've never looked back since. I was highly influenced by my father's reading choices at the beginning. I soon branched out to many different authors and Sci Fi genre's. Early influences include Asimov, Clark, Simak, PKD and other 'golden age' authors. On occasion, I like a good spy book and currently finding early religious history a fascinating subject – despite being an atheist.

Mr Eternity by Aaron Thier

img_2360Two young documentary makers have heard there is an old sailor in Key West who says he is 560 years old. They go to meet him with minds prised open against the cynicism 2016 is steeped in. If they do make a documentary about him, it won’t be mocking – it will be hopeful.

The old sailor, who tells people his name is Daniel Defoe, seems to be in the prime of his life. But if so it’s been a very long prime. Because then we’re introduced to him as the antagonist in a vengeful woman’s tale. He is in South America in 1560 when the Spaniards have destroyed the Aztec and Inca civilizations. Then we meet him again in 1795, a friend of John Green, a man passing for white in the plantations of Bermuda.

But the story of Daniel Defoe doesn’t end there. We meet him again in 2500 in the future Democratic Federation of Mississippi States. A time when the cities of the Atlantic coast are underwater, the union has fallen apart, and cars, plastics, and air conditioning are relegated to history. Then he is an advisor to the King of St. Louis.

Although many things change through the centuries, other things remain constant, and it seems like being on the edge of ruin is one.

This review is probably one of the hardest I’ve written. Not because the book is awful or impossible to figure out when you’re reading it (though I was a little confused at first! Just because it’s somehow really hard to explain. It is a great concept and it’s well executed but I wasn’t quite sure what the message was – was it that the world is always on the edge of extinction so there’s no point worrying about climate change etc. Or was it exactly the opposite? That it really is about tme we stepped back from the edge?

Part of it’s charm is that although Daniel Defoe is always an important character, he’s not the main character in any of the stories. But this is also part of the books failing, we never really know what Daniel thinks.

It is worth reading – but you’ll have to keep your mind open and make it up for yourself!

3.5 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews.

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Find Me by Laura van den Berg

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In a hospital in Kansas there are a select group of patients that all seem to be immune to the epidemic sweeping Amercia. A sickness that begins with silver blisters and memory loss and ends with death has devasted the United States but these patients and their unorthodox Doctor might hold the key to a cure.

One of the patients is Joy. Before she came to the hospital she had a disatisfying job and an addiction to cough syrup. She’d never had much of a life having been in care and foster homes throughout her childhood so she’d figured a few weeks in hospital would be an easy gig. But it isn’t long until their isolation leaves all the patients longing for the outside.

Joy is an interesting protagonist, her flaws and vulnerabilities take centre stage and really are what push her forward in this strange adventure.

This is very much a book of two halves though, I enjoyed the first half set in the hospital, Laura Van Den Berg’s odd, almost dream-like writing style works well set against the institutional structure and feels right expressing Dr Bek’s treatment. But the second half of the book where Joy is trying to travel across the country it seems to lose it’s way a bit. Particularly when she meets another healer with a similar methodology to Dr Bek. It feels a bit repetitious and as the book ended just as she was about to find (or not find) the person she was looking for , it also felt a bit pointless.

I can be a fan of the ambiguous ending when it’s done well, but in this case because there was so much meandering in the second half of the book I really felt it needed a solid ending.

3 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Lives She Left Behind by James Long

IMG_1583There are some books which grab you from the first sentence. This was one. I didn’t buy it straight away due to a distinct lack of funds, and absentmindedly forgot the name of it. And the author. Not wanting to be one of those annoying bookshop customers: “I can’t remember the name of the book, but it had a stag on the cover.” I was relieved to find it displayed on a counter when I went back into the shop after payday.

Joanna’s father Toby had wanted to call her Melissa, but he played no part in the final decision because he died more or less in childbirth.

Joanna, or Jo, is brought up by her mother, Fleur in Yorkshire. Fleur is distant and cold. Angry with her husband for dying, blaming her daughter who’s birth precipitated the accident. From the age of four, Jo knows she isn’t alone. She has a friend in her head called Gally. Gally tells her stories about the past, comforts her when her mother won’t, but Gally grieves and Jo doesn’t understand why. Concerned about her daughter, Fleur takes her to a psychiatrist who puts Jo on tablets. The tablets muffle the world around her, and Gally’s voice fades away.

After being forced out of her job as a developer, Fleur relocates them both to Exeter where Jo becomes friends with Ali an archeologists daughter, and Lucy. At sixteen, the trio join an archeological dig in the village of Montacute in Somerset. Jo feels drawn to the village from the moment she hears the name. Away from the constraints of her mother, she stops taking her tablets and feels a growing bond with the area, especially the nearby village of Pen Selwood.

Meanwhile, local teenager Luke stumbles across the dig. Placing his hand on the soil he feels it recoil, and forgotten memories start to rise to the surface. Schoolteacher Michael Martin is still grieving the loss of his wife and daughter twelve years ago. He blames the move to Pen Selwood for their deaths. His wife Gally was never the same after they arrived and met an eccentric old man called Ferney, who died shortly before their daughter was born. A chance encounter with Luke makes him realise the past cannot be put to rest.

This is a difficult to book to review without giving too much away. The Lives She Left Behind is a sequel to Ferney which has been out of print recently, and has now been republished by Quercus. The story moves through time, although this happens mainly through the reminiscences of the characters. The first third of this book was as good as that first sentence promised it would be. I was genuinely intrigued by the story and wanted to know what on earth was going on.

What bothered me as I read more, was the reactions of the characters. Some are expected to believe stories which would stretch anyone’s rational belief, and while there is a moment of incredulity this is often followed with a shrug of the shoulders and willingness to accept that I didn’t always buy. I also disliked the character of Luke at times, finding him selfish and narrowminded. Maybe this is intentional, but it meant I didn’t always want the outcome that the author obviously hoped I would.

However, it’s a good read and would appeal to fans of Kate Atkinson and Kate Mosse. I have not read Ferney, and probably won’t go back and read it as this book has covered most of the ground that the original did. I would be interested to hear what fans of the first book think of the sequel through. Does it offer anything more, or just retread a previous tale?

3 bites

Kelly Turner
My love of reading began at an early age. I am indebted to my parents for putting "Naughty Amelia Jane" by Enid Blyton in the loft when I was five, forcing me to read something else. At the age of sixteen I picked up my first Discworld novel and never looked back. As well as devouring anything by Terry Pratchett I am also a fan of other fantasy writers such as Neil Gaiman and Ben Aaronovitch. In addition I like to read historical fiction, and enjoy a love story or two.

The Spy by Paulo Coelho

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Mata Hari arrived in Paris penniless and leaving behind a baby daughter. Before long she was famous for her shocking dance recitals, reputation as a courtesan and her fashions.  But with the war came fear. Approached to become a spy she tries to use her position and fame to become a double agent. Then, in 1917 she is arrested.

From her cell she writes a letter to her daughter, telling her the true story of her life. A life lived as fully and sometimes as foolishly as possible.

Mata Hari has long been a person that others find deeply fascinating, who can resist the mix of sex and spying? Combine that with a well known author like Paulo Coelho and that’s best-seller material right there.

But is it worth the money?

Well, I found this a quick and fairly enjoyable read. Coelho has a knack of simplifying even the most complex topics so that this book could be read by someone who had never heard of Mata Hari and who knew nothing about World War One.

The book paints a vivid and colourful picture, it is full of warmth and all the flaws and follies of humanity.

However when I finished it I felt just a little dissatisfied. Maybe it was a little over simplified, maybe it was just the length, it just felt like a dimension was missing.

Worth it for paperback prices, but I couldn’t in all honesty suggest you pay hardback price for it.

3.5 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews.

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet by David Mitchell

imageRed-haired, young Dutch clerk Jacob de Zoet journeys to Dejima to make a fortune worthy of the girl he loves. This tiny, man-made island in the bay of Nagasaki, has been the sole gateway between Japan and the West for two hundred years. Now, in the dying days of the 18th-century, the streets of Dejima are thick with scheming traders, spies, interpreters, servants and concubines as the two cultures converge. Jacob is bedazzled – then he meets a beautiful, intelligent girl with a burned face and is intrigued by her to the point of confusion.

David Mitchell doesn’t write short books, an this becomes an epic tale diving deep into the back stories of its large and varied cast. It also examines the socio-economic climate of the island along with superstitions and new inventions.

In some ways this is wonderful, it’s impossible not to get a great sense of the Dejima of the Dutch, so much so that you can easily imagine yourself there.

But this book is too long. You know I usually read a book within 3 -7 days but this one I genuinely thought would take me a thousand Autumns to get through! Because of that it also did get a little dull and confusing in places, it has more than 125 characters! How’s anyone supposed to keep that straight?

I did get to the end though and I did enjoy a lot of it so I’m going to give it 3.5 bites and live with my indigestion!

 

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Lost Hero by Rick Riordan

hooJason finds himself on a bus on the way to The Grand Canyon along with the rest of the ‘troubled’ kids of the Wilderness Camp- including his best friend Leo and his girlfriend Piper. The trouble is he has no recollection of them or of his life. He doesn’t have long to dwell on the matter though as almost immediately they are attacked by a storm spirit. Fending the storm spirit off results in Jason discovering he can fly… well, control the air currents… and gets them rescued by demi-god heroes from Camp Half-Blood. Shortly afterwards the three find themselves on a quest to rescue an imprisoned goddess, save the world and find out who they really are….

The first in a new series by award winning author Rick Riordan, this book is a spin off from the incredibly popular Percy Jackson books. Whilst it is not imperative to had read those before this, it would certainly help.

Riordan continues with his tried and tested formula of mingling the ancient Greek myths with the modern world creating an entertaining, if surreal, hidden world of cyclopes, satyrs, spirits of the air, and gods and goddesses, both minor and major, meddling in the lives of the children of the gods- the Heroes of Olympus.

As a piece of YA literature, The Lost Hero succeeds in its aims. It imparts life lessons and history lessons all wrapped up in a pacy and humorous tale. The jokes may not be flowing all the time but the melding of the old world and the new provides much to smile at. The ages of the demi-god protagonists provide teenaged angst to relate to in a clean and wholesome manner and the lines of good and evil are blurred just enough to make the characters well-rounded and interesting.

Although much older than the target audience, I have nonetheless enjoyed reading this and have actually read two of the four sequels in quick succession. I have enjoyed the pace of the story- it is episodic and yet still feels like the story flows naturally. The characters are distinctive and not too perfect despite the fact they are heroes!
I particularly enjoy the references to the Greek myths and legends and have actually been inspired to look up several of them to see what they originally were.

3 bites and a recommendation to teenagers everywhere to get a copy of these books.

 

Rachel Brazil
Although well-known amongst my family for my habit of falling asleep with a book on my face, I’ve not let the constant face bruises deter me from indulging in my favourite pastime. There is no famine, only feast, in my house with every flavour of book available for consumption. I’m happy to sample almost anything from the smorgasbord of literature available but can always be tempted with a juicy murder mystery or sweet little romance.

Maestra by L S Hilton

maestra_book_coverIt was bound to happen one day, a best seller written to a computer designed recipe. That’s how L.S Hiltons Maestra “The most shocking thriller of the year” comes across.

The recipe:-
Take lots of kinky sex, add copious amounts of designer shopping, half a dozen over ripe billionaire playgrounds, blend with super yachts, power and money. spice with murder and major art fraud, add a pinch of humour. Leave in a warm place to rise. If it doesn’t rise add more sex and a hedge fund or two.

The computer also says that you must grab the reader’s attention by getting in a torrid sex scene within the first fifty pages. The plot of Maestra didn’t allow for this, so instead the publishers put in a prologue which described three characters involved in a bizarre sex act. This prologue was so badly written that it was impossible to understand who was doing what, to whom and why. This seemingly irrelevant prologue turned out to be an extract from a sex scene which appeared later in the book. After reading it for a second time I was still none the wiser.

All novels are published with the intention of making money and it comes as no surprise that someone came up with the idea that “Fifty Shades of Grey”, but this time instead of EL James it should be written by a gifted and intelligent author, This would surely be a best seller. The author L.S Hilton fits the bill, formerly an historical biographer she is both gifted and intelligent, her writing (apart from the sex scenes) is often beautiful and the plot, involving the art world and money laundering, was well researched. Her knowlege of Italian art was impressive. As an artist myself, I was fascinated to learn about Agnolo Bronzino and Artemesia Gentileschi (I had to put the book down to look them up on Wikipedia).

The clever and convoluted plot moved along at a cracking pace. I read it in a day. Maestra has been described as a bonkbuster and as romp. To me it didn’t fit into either category, it was simply too dark, the anti-heroine Judith Rashleigh was too cold, calculating and cynical to earn any affection. Frankly I couldn’t have cared less if she lived or died.

The recipe lacked a few ounces of warmth and humour, they would have made all the difference. As it was I felt that Maestra was half baked.

Three Bites from me.

Jeff Short
I was born into a Forces family so naturally enjoyed Biggles as a child alongside Enid Blyton. I fell in love with the Librarian at RAF Akrotiri and read and read so that i could see her every day. The book that I read there that had the greatest impact on me was Joseph Heller’s Catch 22 - set on an American airbase on a small island in the Mediterranean, and filled with military incompetence with black humour. I could never take service life seriously again. I usually has three books on the go at any one time. Kindle, Audio and a proper book. My favourite genres are military memoirs and thrillers but being compulsive I'll read anything.

Cleaning up in the Valkyrie Suite by Julia Ross

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I nearly didn’t read this because of the title, it conjured up a Jackie Collins styled bonk buster in which a Cinderella styled chambermaid shoots from grubby sheets to diamonds. I was therefore unexpectedly pleased to find the main protagonist to be an intelligent fifty plus woman with a wry sense of humour and a real sense of job commitment.

Prudence Baxter spent thirty years of her working life being a Personal Assistant to a CEO until recession wiped out the hundred year old family firm she had dedicated so much time to. Living alone in the glorious whimsical and utterly decrepit Edwardian mansion that she grew up in Pru is desperate for work of any kind to keep the lights on and so, through a series of slight misunderstandings, she becomes a chambermaid in a brand new hotel in the east Midlands. Expected to dress in a pink sweatshirt and matching jogging bottoms emblazoned with the name of the hotel, Pru quickly discovers that modern day housekeeping bears little resemblance to Gosford Park and that far from being staffed by experienced people speaking clearly and demonstrating a proper sense of order the hotel is utterly disorganised and the receptionist can’t speak English. Her interest and curiosity are quickly sparked by peculiarities in the routines and behaviours of her fellow workers and she finds herself on the scent of some very dodgy dealings. A most unexpected meeting with Mark the hotel owner opens her eyes to more than one secret that’s been well hidden and she finds out that there is rather more to one of her old friends than she had realised. With danger lurking around every corner our unusual sleuth sets out to find who is refolding the triangles on the end of the toilet roll in the Valkyrie Suite.

 

Well-polished and neatly executed this was a thoroughly entertaining and humorous read that I really enjoyed. Delightfully up to date in its themes (cross dressing, immigration, unemployment) it totally avoided the excessive cosiness that comes with many novels about middle-aged female detectives. Witty and pithy her female characters are feisty and determined and I heartily recommend it.

A good 3 bites from me for this tasty snack

Tamara Thomas
I am the only girl and youngest of four children, I grew up in a home stuffed with books, and now some fifty years later, great piles of them still appear in every room I inhabit. I won’t waste my time reading books that leave me feeling sour, dirty or depressed; books are a source of light and inspiration in my world. Nevertheless, I love a book that makes me cry with loss or sadness such as Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Book Thief. Bliss is a winter’s afternoon on the sofa, snuggled in with my dogs, stove blazing and an absorbing book.