Goblin by Ever Dundas

IMG_2576Goblin is just a young child when an World War 2 begins. Her mother doesn’t like her so she leads a semi-feral life with a gang of young children amidst the craters of London’s Blitz. She only goes home to eat and sleep, to help her father fix things for their neighbours, and to dream dreams of becoming a pirate with her older brother. He’s almost old enough to sign up but he’s got no plans to, explaining to her what a conscientious objector is. Then he doesn’t come home and she is evacuated and her letters to him go unanswered. Freed from London and living near the coast unfetters her imagination and she takes refuge in a self-constructed but magical imaginary world.

In 2011, Goblin is an eccentric and secretive old lady. She volunteers at the local library and helps outcasts and animals when she can. But then some old photos are found showing the pet cemetary reminding the country of one of the great shames of the war – when we slaughtered our pets to protect them from a German invasion and torture. But one photo shows Goblin and an even greater atrocity. She is forced to return to a London that is once again burning and face her past. Will she have the strength to reveal the truth or will it drive her over the edge to insanity?

This is the kind of book that will appeal to fans of a variety of different fiction. At its heart is a mystery wrapped in the gruesome darkness of war. But it also has elements of gothic fantasy, fascinating oddball characters, a coming of age story and love and redemption. Trying to cram this much into one book could be confusing but in this case it adds to the mystery. Goblin herself is weird and wonderful both as a child and as an old woman. She has heart and sass in equal measures and though she can be sharp and grumpy her honesty is appealing, even whilst she keeps so much hidden.

This is a book I’ll be re-reading!

5 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Saint Death by Marcus Sedgwick

cover96034-mediumIn one of the poorest neighbourhoods in Mexico, just twenty metres beyond the border with America, lives Faustino. A desperate orphan who’s just made a big mistake. He’s dipped into a pile of dollars he was supposed to be hiding for a gang he wanted to escape from. Now he and his friend, Arturo, have only 36 hours to replace the missing money, or they’re as good as dead.

He’s praying to Saint Death – the beautiful and terrifying goddess who demands absolute loyalty and promises little but a chance in return.

This is children’s literature unlike any I’ve ever read (embarrassingly I’ve no real excuse for reading as many kids / young adult books as I do!) It is aimed at older children, a mature eleven or twelve year old could read it but generally over 13’s. However this is 100% suitable for adults.

It is brash and brutal. And brilliant. There’s nothing I can fault about it at all, the storyline is terrific, the characters utterly believable and their dilemmas beautifully poignant, and the writing is clear and expressive.

What I love about reading books for young adults and children is their honesty. Children have a thirst for the truth, they don’t seem to want to deny the horrors and mistakes in the world the same way that adults do, maybe because they don’t bear the burden of blame for any of it. This is one of those books, a truth-telling book. It peels back the stereotypes of fiesta Mexico – Mariachi bands, Cinque de Mayo,Burritos, Pinantas and the Mexican Wave, and shows the pitiable lives of those living in poverty. But more than that, it shows their humanity.

It isn’t a long book, perfect packing wise for a holiday read. Forget the scandi noir this summer holiday and take this.

5 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

One Of Us Is Lying by Karen McManus

cover106249-mediumThe Young Adult thriller is becoming a respected genre, and there shouldn’t be anything surprising about that. After all passions run high in teen years and sometimes those passions run over sense.

This book is great for fans of The Breakfast Club, Pretty Little Liars and 13 Reasons Why.

One afternoon, five students walk into detention, but only four walk out. Those that walk out are Bronwyn a Yale-bound good girl, Addy, the picture-perfect homecoming princess, Nate, the bad boy and Cooper, the jock. So far so stereotypical.

Simon, the one that dies, is an outcast and the creator of their school’s notorious gossip app. Only, Simon never makes it out of that classroom.

It seems like his death wasn’t an accident, he’d planned to post juicy reveals about the four he was sharing detention with. Should they be suspects in his murder. Or are they just the perfect patsies for a killer who’s still on the loose?

I must admit most of the reason I read this book was because the publicity department was so full on about it. I got a free review copy and I left reading it until just a couple of weeks ago. I love The Breakfast club and quite enjoyed Pretty Little Liars but this seemed a little to generic for my taste.

Was I right? Yes and no. At first glance the characters are all a little stereotypical; but as their secrets are uncovered there are surprising depths to them. And the plot also has some surprising twists and turns.

Once I started it I found it hard to put down, it has that thing that good thrillers have where you think you know what’s going on but it keeps throwing curveballs so you want to get to the end quickly to prove yourself right. Or is that just me? Anyway I was right!

It isn’t the most highbrow read but it is pacy and has a good moral centre.

3.5 Bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Blackout by Marc Elsberg

 

Click for Waterstones
Click for Waterstones

I found this thriller totally plausible, shockingly relevant and very frightening – my sensitivity to the scenarios being somewhat enhanced by waking up that same day to find much of the world experiencing a cyber-attack – spread through the use of the WannaCry ransomware. So severe was the problem that the UK convened a meeting of the emergency Cobra committee as 48 out of 248 NHS trusts in England and organisations across nearly 100 countries found themselves under attack.

The premise of the book is that society throughout the developed world is totally dependent on energy, not just for the light in our homes or the fuel in our car but for everything. Food distribution, water pumping, sewage drainage, removal of dead bodies and of course medical needs are the top of the priority list for most of us – but without energy in the form of electricity everything stops. The plot is simple. A small group of disillusioned techie experts launch a cyber-attack designed to bring down the energy generating and distribution systems across Europe and America. They want to change the political face of the developed world and what better way to disrupt society, create panic and ultimately trigger a public uprising against the established order can there be? What is terrifying is the speed with which their anticipated outcomes start to happen. Within 24 hours there is general disorganisation and mild panic, 24 hours later there are food shortages, within a week price extortionists are selling basic food stuffs for hundreds of times their value. The combination of hunger and thirst, the lack of medicines, no drainage, no communication networks and, before you know it, society is on the verge of collapse. To add to the confusion the hackers have made full use of inadequate security and corporate dependency on phones and emails, to ensure they can monitor and misdirect the Interagency attempts to control the disaster.

The hero, Manzano, is a mature Italian exhacker with principles and a curious nature. He is ably supported by an indefatigable young American reporter named Lauren Shannon and the well-connected Sophia Angstrom who works in EUMIC, the pan European organisation for communications and aid coordination in the event of catastrophe (you understand why they shortened it to EUMIC!). As always those who are on the outside of such organisations in times of crisis can be seen by the authorities to be a source of the trouble and poor Manzano quickly finds that his initial contribution to a solution draws down attention that is less than welcome. The story also follows a couple of characters as they wrestle with the difficulty of wanting to keep their family safe but they have no way of knowing whether their decisions will achieve what they hope. The action zigzags around the various emergency control centres across Europe that are working day and night to resolve the crisis as security analysts, engineers, investigators and police co-ordinate their efforts.The characterisations are adequate for the story and at no point does Elsberg make it overly dramatic – which works in its favour.

The book is a gripping read. Fast paced and extremely well researched; and it is this research that sets it apart from the usual disaster / breakdown of society type films. (I am not a techie person but I was quite fascinated by why the power plants couldn’t just be started up again). This book isn’t just a bit of light escapism unlike a Dan Brown novel, instead it is thought provoking and makes for uncomfortable reading. The moment I finished it I passed it to my husband to read and he experienced a similar response. I was really unsure quite how to rate this book but have given it 4 bites for its sheer plausibility.

Tamara Thomas
I am the only girl and youngest of four children, I grew up in a home stuffed with books, and now some fifty years later, great piles of them still appear in every room I inhabit. I won’t waste my time reading books that leave me feeling sour, dirty or depressed; books are a source of light and inspiration in my world. Nevertheless, I love a book that makes me cry with loss or sadness such as Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Book Thief. Bliss is a winter’s afternoon on the sofa, snuggled in with my dogs, stove blazing and an absorbing book.

The Run-Out Groove (The Vinyl Detective 2) by Andrew Cartmel

It was this time last year that I first read about The Vinyl Detective after having read Andrew Cartmel’s debut novel, and long time readers of this blog will know that I LOVED it! So I was beyond excited when the sequel dropped through my letter box a few weeks ago (in a super shiny gold envelope nonetheless!). It’s out on Tuesday so I had to keep schtum until today! I really wanted to tell you all about it though!

TROGHis first adventure consisted of the search for a rare record; his second the search for a lost child. Specifically the child of Valerian, lead singer of a great rock band of the 1960s, who hanged herself in mysterious circumstances after the boy’s abduction.

Along the way, the Vinyl Detective finds himself marked for death, at the wrong end of a shotgun, and unknowingly dosed with LSD as a prelude to being burned alive. And then there’s the grave robbing…

 

 

 

Similar in format to the first in the series, The Run-Out Groove follows our Vinyl Detective in searching for a lost child… not quite the same as a lost record but surprisingly, a similar amount of high-jinks ensues!

The favourite characters are back- Nevada, Tinkler, Clean Head- and continue to assist our protagonist throughout the dangerous and peculiar circumstances he finds himself in. The Vinyl Detective himself is still as unassuming, serious and as knowledgeable about music as ever, whilst managing to maintain that dry adult humour that made me laugh aloud so often in the first book.
I think Tinkler may be my favourite character- he is very well written, well-rounded, funny and three-dimensional. The newer characters are a tad weaker but that’s to be expected given we’ve spent more time with the regulars and says more about he strengths of the regulars than anything.

The plot is another twister, racing along at times with enough to keep me hooked. Again, I can’t give too much away because spoilers suck! But suffice to say that you won’t be bored! I didn’t quite read this in one sitting but to be fair to the book, it was absolute torture putting it down! I didn’t want to, I wanted to keep turning the pages and finding out more of their progress in discovering what happened to Valerian and her child.

It’s not quite full marks from me. It wasn’t quite the same joy of reading as the first, in large part because it felt similar to the first. This is probably a bit unfair of me as the similarities aren’t a criticism but it’s still a consideration. I also think that Cartmel occasionally seems a bit unsure as to whether he is writing a solely lighthearted series or whether he wants to dip his toe into the darker and murkier areas of mystery writing. I hope for one he keeps it lighthearted in the next book which is due next year. I’m still very much looking forward to reading it.

4 bites for a satisfying second course!

Rachel Brazil
Although well-known amongst my family for my habit of falling asleep with a book on my face, I’ve not let the constant face bruises deter me from indulging in my favourite pastime. There is no famine, only feast, in my house with every flavour of book available for consumption.

I’m happy to sample almost anything from the smorgasbord of literature available but can always be tempted with a juicy murder mystery or sweet little romance.

Dead Cold by Louise Penny

Whale oil beef hooked!

Click here for Waterstones link
Click here for Waterstones link

How do you electrocute a person without electricity, out on a frozen lake, in front of a whole crowd of people without anyone seeing you? As Gamache muses “You used to be able to electrocute someone in a bathtub …but toss a toaster into your spouse’s bath these days and all you’ll get is a blown fuse, a ruined appliance and a very pissed off sweetheart” this is the conundrum that pulls him and his team back to the tiny township village of Three Pines. The village of Three Pines is isolated and safe, tucked deep in a valley, so much so that mobile phones and much of modern technology are unreliable and this enables an atmosphere of otherworldliness to exist that in part protects the residents. Contemplation, community and friendship take precedence over social media and the modern world.

Here in the second of her novels Penny starts to reveal the sadness, the fears and the joys that lie hidden in the depths of her characters. Snippets of poetry by Margaret Atwood, Leonard Cohen and Marylynn Plessner enhance the story and are skilfully and concisely used to express emotions. Weaving together beautiful prose and occasional humour the author brings the village to sparkling life. Grumpy old Ruth and Gabri the delightfully camp bistro owner have slanging matches that prove that the best insults are traded between friends and that love comes in many forms. The deep and gentle love between poetry quoting Gamache and his wife Reine-Marie is but one form.

So – to the plot…..

An extremely uptight and self-centred woman by the name of CC de Poitiers has decided to enlighten the world by launching a book on her theory of divinity and peace through the colour White. Colours are bad, emotions are colours run wild and they need to be controlled and balanced because White can only be produced through the perfect blending of the other colours. But CC is the extreme opposite of calm, her hen-pecked and cuckolded husband and grotesquely fat and bullied daughter Crie are testament to CC’s belittling nature. CC cannot bear to see potential in others and is the antipathy of the kindness that Three Pines engenders in many of its residents. Electrocuted in public on the day of the annual curling match the trail of clues leads back to a group of elderly women bound by time and love and secrets. However CC was not the only resident to enjoy a book launch, the village’s long time resident and grouchy poet Ruth has released upon the world a slender volume entitled “I’m FINE” which readers gradually come to understand as meaning fucked-up, insecure, neurotic and egotistical. Yet oddly no-one has thought to murder her -yet…

Great new characters such as Billy Williams who speaks in a dialect quite unintelligible to Gamache (see first line) are a source of humour and local colour. The behaviours of people who we have not yet met such as the senior Mrs Morrow (Clara’s fearsome and spiteful mother-in-law) are introduced. The old cow has sent Clara a Christmas present of herbal bath soak – only for Clara to discover while using it that it is really dried vegetable soup. But then Clara makes big mistakes – after all she mistook a stinking old bum curled on a street for God.

Penny starts to reveal snippets of the backstory to Gamache. Why has the career of a skilled and intelligent Surete officer stalled when his record of solving crimes is so good? Gamache brought a senior officer to justice and restored honour to the Surete – but now he and his team are the pariahs. Penny gives no real answers in this novel instead allowing this backstory to run through the whole series and gradually build to a crescendo – in my opinion this is what sets these detective stories apart.

Hard for me to rate these books objectively when I know the series inside out but I think it would rate 4 bites from many fellow Book Eaters.

Tamara Thomas
I am the only girl and youngest of four children, I grew up in a home stuffed with books, and now some fifty years later, great piles of them still appear in every room I inhabit. I won’t waste my time reading books that leave me feeling sour, dirty or depressed; books are a source of light and inspiration in my world. Nevertheless, I love a book that makes me cry with loss or sadness such as Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Book Thief. Bliss is a winter’s afternoon on the sofa, snuggled in with my dogs, stove blazing and an absorbing book.

The Twelve Lives Of Samuel Hawley by Hannah Tinti

img_2364Samuel Hawley did not have the best start in life and by the time he’s a teenager he is involved in petty crime to keep body and soul together. Then he moves onto bigger jobs with higher stakes but much bigger pay-offs. But when he meets Lily he knows everything has to change.

Years later he moves back to Lily’s hometown with their teenage daughter Loo. It’s time to stop running, he becomes a fisherman, while Loo struggles to fit in at school. Meeting her grandmother makes her curious about her mother’s mysterious death and the twelve bullet scars Hawley carries on his body.

Soon Hawley’s past and Loo’s investigations collide. Can they survive?

Okay, first things first, on the official blurb for this book it says that it’s perfect for fans of The Watchmaker of Filigree Street. It’s really not. Not that fans of that book can’t like this one (I enjoyed both) but they are nothing whatsoever alike so liking one will not predispose you to like the other.

This is an interesting work, it’s a combination of a literary thriller and a coming of age novel. There’s plenty of action and more than 12 bullets but it also explores what makes a family, living with grief, the value of a human life, first love, community tensions, ecological issues and the sacrifices and manipulations we commit to protect the people we love most. Most of all it’s a story about a father-daughter relationship and how when we do something for love rather than for money we become heroes.

Quite a lot packed into a regular sized novel! And overall it works, most of the characters are convincing and easy to feel at least a little sympathy for. The settings are easy to visualise and the language paints windows for the reader to see into their lives. The story is well constructed, in fact this is where Tinti’s talent excels. She uses the scars on Hawleys body to draw us back into different parts of his past, to show us what made him the man he is and even though I didn’t feel like I had any idea what the point of it was for the first half of it I was happy to trust the author that it wasn’t just going to be ‘killing time’ book. As you can see from the paragraph above I wasn’t disappointed!

My only criticism of it was that there were a few moments when it dragged a bit. But literally only 2 or 3 and it soon picked up again each time. Reading this is like eating steak, there’s a little gristle but there’s also sweetness and nourishment if you persevere. If you like gritty American dramas or books with complicated characters this book is for you.

Four Bites.

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews.

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Outliers by Kimberly McCreight

imageWylie isn’t doing too well since her mum died, to be honest she wasn’t doing brilliantly before either. She’s always been a loner but her only friend Cassie had started hanging out with the popular crowd and even started dating a jock. The fact that Cassie had started drinking heavily too had added a real strain to their friendship.

But now Cassie is missing, and she’s just sent Wylie a text asking her to come and rescue her. Wylie hasn’t left her house in a month, can she overcome her fears to help her friend? And just who is Cassie with and what do they want with her?

This is a great, pacy thriller. Aimed squarely at the young adult market but absolutely readable for adult readers too. The story is complex but McCreight’s writing is very easy to follow so you may be perplexed by the plot but you won’t be flummoxed by words on the page, just what you need in a thriller. I won’t tell you any more details of the plot but the premise is unusual and some of the red herrings laid along the way create unique plot points … my mind was whirring!

It’s written in the first person and although Wylie has her issues, she’s still someone you want to spend time with. She may be anxious and at times angry, but she doesn’t slip over into sulky and whiny. The other characters, as seen through her eyes, are interesting and realistic too.

I read this in about a day, picking it up to find out what was happening at every available opportunity. It’s the first of a trilogy and I’ll be looking out for the next book – as this has been out a little while and is just being released in paperback I’m hoping I don’t have to wait too long!

4 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Still Life by Louise Penny

Louise Penny won the CWA John Creasey dagger in 2006 with this – the first in the series about Chief Inspector Gamache.

Seventy six year old Jane Neal has lived in the sleepy, remote village of Three Pines all her life. She knows everyone and as the retired school teacher many from the younger generations were taught by her. Life is peaceful in Three Pines, crime is rare, the local newspaper carries headlines about homemade patchwork quilts and people only lock their doors to prevent generous neighbours from gifting excess zucchini at harvest time. When Jane is found dead – shot by an arrow – the villagers are shaken out of their cosy world and secrets long hidden away tumble out into the light of day. Murder or freak accident in the woods, it’s up to Gamache to find out.

The first in the series - click through link to Waterstones
The first in the series – click through link to Waterstones

This is Gamache’s first visit to Three Pines and the villagers are lucky to have him investigate. Wise, gentle and genuinely interested in people he is always surprised by violent death and knows that the truths that will be uncovered in his investigation will hurt more than just the deceased. Along with Inspector Jean Guy Beauvoir, Agent Isabelle Lacoste and trainee Yvette Nichol he is about to examine every aspect of this village’s life.

First up is the discovery that certain homophobic youths had been caught by Jane while throwing manure at the front of the Bistro as an act of violence against Gabri and Olivier who run it. Next they find that Jane is a secret artist, so secret that by the time the police gain access to her home any art she may have produced has vanished with the exception of one curiously naïve and hideous piece that had been entered for a local exhibition. Then they discover that a surprisingly high number of the local population belong to the archery club which in addition to all the hunting tourists makes the field of suspects massive. But Gamache knows that trouble usually starts close to home and that “a man’s foes shall be they of his own household” Matthew 10:36. That quote is a refrain throughout the series but here in the first book we the reader have yet to learn how that will weave its way through the stories that follow.

Among the many rewarding and warming things they discover about the inhabitants of Three Pines is that Gabri – a large man in a frilly apron with a penchant for silver screen dramatic touches – is also the most wonderful chef. Quite broken at the death of his dear friend Jane, Gabri bakes rosewater muffins in tribute to her and her love of roses. More truths about Jane come to light at her memorial service when ascerbic old poet Ruth sings ‘what do you do with a drunken sailor’ and Jane’s friends join in, finding pleasure in the memory that it was the only song Jane had ever taught them in school and even the nativity play had featured it.

Meanwhile Gamache is having trouble with his newest recruit. Agent Nichol hears but doesn’t listen, and every encouraging or thoughtful attempt to support her training that Gamache makes is seen by her as a sign of muddled, old-fashioned thinking. Her pride nearly sabotages the investigation more than once, but slowly the field is narrowed and the picture comes into focus. Over protective parents, changed wills and ghastly wallpaper cannot hide the truth for ever and the reasons behind the murder of one old woman are finally laid bare.

This book is fine read as a one-off, but it is really just the briefest introduction to a wonderful series packed with tremendous characters that I guarantee will become old friends if you give them a chance.

 

Tamara Thomas
I am the only girl and youngest of four children, I grew up in a home stuffed with books, and now some fifty years later, great piles of them still appear in every room I inhabit. I won’t waste my time reading books that leave me feeling sour, dirty or depressed; books are a source of light and inspiration in my world. Nevertheless, I love a book that makes me cry with loss or sadness such as Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Book Thief. Bliss is a winter’s afternoon on the sofa, snuggled in with my dogs, stove blazing and an absorbing book.

Perfume by Patrick Suskind

IMG_2403A woman is pregnant in eighteenth-century Paris, she stops work to give birth by her fish stall in slum market-place. There, amidst the dirt and the stench Jean-Baptiste Grenouille is born without any odour of his own, But with a nose that can discern and define any scent at all.

Through sheer force of will he forces his way into an apprenticeship position with a prominent perfumer. He proves his nose can copy the greatest scents and in return he is taught the ancient arts of distillation, effleurage and mixing precious oils and herbs.

But Grenouille’s obsession leads him to experiment with capturing other scents too –  the odours of objects such as brass doorknobs and even of excrement. Then one day he catches a hint of the perfect scent. The scent that invokes love in all who come into contact with it. Grenouille has never been adored. He must capture the scent and create the ultimate perfume with it. No matter the cost…

This book is one of my all time favourites.

Everything about it is brilliant. The concept, the characterisations, the descriptions, the ending. In fact the ending is so good that when I first read it I was coming to the end of it as I arrived at my home train station. I got off the train but I straight away sat down on the platform bench to finish it. There was just no way I could wait the ten minute walk home to read the end of it.

This time I listened to the audio book version of it. I was a little worried beforehand – a bad narrator could have ruined it. But every single second was a joy. In fact being able to listen to it whilst walking or driving through the country with so many scents drifting around may even have improved it!

If you haven’t read this get a copy now. If you have – treat yourself and re-read it! You won’t regret it!

5 very tasty bites!!

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Who hurt you once, so far beyond repair – a feature about the works of Louise Penny

Louise Penny
Louise Penny

Two years ago I picked up “Bury Your Dead” from a second hand book stall and on reading the jacket notes I was enticed by the image of a beautiful Quebec winter juxtaposed with murder in a sedate and dusty historical society. Little did I know that I was about to be hooked but by the time I had finished that book I was already scouring book stalls and charity shops for the rest of the series. When I couldn’t get them all secondhand I bit the bullet and ordered the rest.

Penny is a Canadian author who started writing in her early 50s. Previously a journalist and broadcaster she imbues her books with a maturity of observation honed by her years of listening and precise questioning. As she pust it “Listening. That was the key. A good interviewer rarely speaks, she listens. Closely and carefully”.

Her love for the Canadian weather and landscape in every season is apparent in each of the novels and is elemental in many of the stories – as is the tension between the crazy ‘Anglais’ and the French speaking Quebecers. However what I find particularly attractive about her work is not the new murder that each book presents but the real story that lies in the lives and backgrounds of the characters who recur throughout the series. An entire web of relationships going back decades is gradually pieced together and referenced throughout – even when a character does not appear in a book they are still mentioned by the others. The central figure is Chief Inspector Gamache, warm, wise, calm and thoughtful he heads up the Homicide Division of the Surete. He is a pillar of humanity and integrity and yet he has learned that betrayal often comes from those who are closest.

Penny is in no rush to disclose the backgrounds and baggage of her characters. Instead she presents them to us as strangers occasionally display odd behaviours and mannerisms that are left unexplained– it is the quirks, losses and fears that underpin those behaviours that she gently reveals to us as the stories unfold.  I am sure that for many readers Ruth Zardo becomes a firm favourite. Elderly, dictatorial, extremely rude and given to drinking other people’s whisky out of vases, Ruth is a broken down old poet with an incredible soul. She is both gifted and cursed by being able to see past the façade of others and expresses the pain and loss in exquisite poetry and opens her withered heart enough to pour out her love on a duckling she adopts. Clara, another fascinating character and a local artist, paints Ruth’s portrait and shows her as an aged, forgotten and embittered Virgin Mary who at the final moment sees hope. The rescuing of lame ducks, both figurative and actual, stands as a metaphor for redemption and hope.

The first in the series - click through link to Waterstones
The first in the series – click through link to Waterstones

Gamache is laughed at by many of his colleagues for choosing officers who have been rejected by other commands, officers who are misfits, from which to build his team. His belief in redemption places strain on his second in command Jean-Guy who occasionally forgets that he also was ‘rescued’ by Gamache. The relationship between these men is many-layered and intense and Penny wove into their story the damage caused by addiction and fear and the rehabilitation of the soul. All the characters continue maturing while also revealing more about their pasts; loves lost, dreams despoiled and friends found. The intricacy and delicacy of the back stories is testament to her observational skills and even references events in the life of Penny herself. The title of this feature is from a poem (Marylyn Plessners’s  ‘Beyond Repair’) that Penny quotes throughout the series and its theme is key to the narrative. Poetry is a motif of the series and she also drew from the works of  Margaret Atwood, Stevie Shaves and others – including the haunting lyrics of Leonard Cohen.

I realise that I have you almost nothing of the plots – they’re good but secondary to the characters; or of the remote and wonderful village, Three Pines – that is both sanctuary and murder site; or of the bistro run by Olivier and Gabri with the constant supply of wonderful food and drinks that makes me think Penny could have had an alternative career as a food critic. In fact there is so much I can’t possibly convey in this feature that I think I shall simply have to start a new series of reviews and do one book per month.

Tamara Thomas
I am the only girl and youngest of four children, I grew up in a home stuffed with books, and now some fifty years later, great piles of them still appear in every room I inhabit. I won’t waste my time reading books that leave me feeling sour, dirty or depressed; books are a source of light and inspiration in my world. Nevertheless, I love a book that makes me cry with loss or sadness such as Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Book Thief. Bliss is a winter’s afternoon on the sofa, snuggled in with my dogs, stove blazing and an absorbing book.

Miss Treadaway & The Field Of Stars by Miranda Emmerson

img_2361
Click here to order from Waterstones

Anna Treadway has made a life for herself in London, she lives in a little flat above a Turkish Cafe on Neal Street and has a job dressing the actresses at the Galaxy Theatre.

But 1965 is going to be a disruptive year for her. The American actress she’s dressing –  Iolanthe Green – leaves the theatre as usual one night but doesn’t turn up for the next performance. Soon the newspapers are wild with speculation about her fate. Then the news grows old and it seems to Anna that she is the only person left that cares.

As she searches she stumbles into a different world, a world of jazz clubs and illegal abortions, where the colour of your skin could get you beaten and left in a prison cell.

I have to admit the main reason I picked up this book is because I spent some of the happiest years of my life on Neal Street. So the chance to spend some time there, even in a different era, was too good to miss.

I was a bit worried that this might veer too hard into the romance hinted at on the original blurb and therefore turn into a feast of marshmallow gooiness. However, though there is sweetness in this book, there is also bitterness. Miranda Emmerson has created range of compelling characters from diverse backgrounds without either patronising them or exploiting them. In this she has recreated a honest tableau of London life both in the 60’s and since.

This book has a theme, and a message but it is one that takes a while to emerge. That’s not a problem though as the mystery of Iolanthe’s disappearance and the way that Emmerson’s description’s of London’s wintery nights are seductive and it’s easy to keep reading whilst the message reveals itself slowly.

This is a book I’d definitely recommend – in fact there’s a few people I can think of that would definitely like it so a few copies may well end up wrapped in birthday wrapping paper in the next couple of months!

4 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews.

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Watchmaker of Filigree Street by Natasha Pulley

the-watchmaker-of-filigree-street
Click here to order from Waterstones

Thaniel Steepleton is getting by rather than living. His job as a telegraphist at the Home Office earns him just enough to support his widowed sister but not enough for him to afford to pursue his love of music. Then one day he returns to his tiny flat to find a gold pocketwatch on his pillow. It isnt a birthday present from his sister but unfortunately he has no time to investigate further as a credible bomb threat has just come through.

When the watch saves Thaniel’s life in the threatened blast, he starts to investigate where it came from. His search leads him to its maker, Keita Mori – a gentle Japanese man whose seductive world of clockwork and music entrances him. Meanwhile, Grace Carrow will soon be making her entrance into his life but meanwhile she is sneaking into an Oxford library dressed as a man. A theoretical physicist, she is desperate to prove the existence of the luminiferous ether before her mother can force her to marry.

This blend of historical fiction and fantasy creates an enchanting steampunk-esque thriller. A character that can remember the future, one that can see sounds, the aforemantioned theoretical physicist, plus detectives from Scotland Yard, Japanese ambassadors, Irish nationalists and cameo appearances from Gilbert and Sullivan show what a talented writer Natasha Pulley is. Each character is utterly believable even if they barely grace the page.

The plot is intriguing but the author also adds in magical details like a clockwork Octopus with a penchant for stealing socks so there is never a dull moment. But these details are never just gratuitous. I can’t say any more than that or I’ll be guilty of spoilers!

One of the things that really sets this book aside though is the attention to sentence structure. That might sound like a very dry thing to say but when a book contains so many teeny tiny nibbles of pure bliss then the dish as a whole is definitely going to be tasty!

If you want some well-crafted escapism pick this up!

4 Bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Motion of Puppets by Keith Donohue

img_2252Kay Harper is spending the summer as an acrobat in the Old City of Québec, her new husband Theo has decamped there with her and the two fall in love with the quaintness of the place. In particular Kay falls in love with a puppet in the window of the Quatre Mains, a toy shop that is never open.

One night, fearing she is being followed, she notices the lights of the toy shop are on and the door is open. She dives inside.

Theo wakes up curious at her absent, by evening it is clear that she’s missing. Searching for her he starts hanging around the circus and bonds with one of the workers. But the weeks drag on and he falls under police suspicion himself. Eventually he has to head home. Then his mother-in-law contacts him convinced she saw Kay on television and the quest to find her is back on – but it will stretch the limits of his sanity.

I’m a little bit at a loss for how to describe this book. It was a sensory feast, full of colours and shade, scents and seasons. But all overlaid with tension, despair and hope. There is a fantastical element to it but that never overtakes the sense of reality about it. The characters are varied but even the most unbelievable are believable.

It’s a fairly quick read, a little more body to it wouldn’t hurt but it’s not necessary. I can’t give it five bites because it didn’t make me question anything but I’ll definitely look out for more books by Keith Donohue!.

4 Bites

 

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

My Sister’s Bones by Nuala Ellwood

Debut novel
Debut novel

Kate and Sally grew up in the family home in Herne Bay. From early childhood they would frequently witness their drunken father viciously beating their mother and when Kate moved to intervene he would beat her too. Realising that an earlier family tragedy had inextricably bound her parents together Kate escaped as soon as she could and now sees violence and bloodshed on a near daily basis as a war reporter. Sally became an emotionally damaged teenaged mother who struggled to manage her daughter, but life sometimes gives second chances and now she has an adoring spouse. Nevertheless her daughter Hannah ran away at the age of sixteen and Sally is driven to seek refuge in alcohol abuse and denial.

Their father is long dead when the tale begins but now their mother has died and Kate has flown home to settle her mother’s estate. Sally is drunk for most of the time and the animosity between the sisters is such that Kate has opted to stay alone in their mum’s house and enjoy the peace. But peace is something Kate cannot find, suffering from PTSD from her work as a war reporter she can barely sleep and combines pills with alcohol to blot out the vivid nightmares. To add to her misery her long-term lover has ended their relationship in favour of his wife and Kate has miscarried the only baby she might ever have had. Confusing nightmares and family history with current reality Kate becomes certain that there is an unhappy child in the house next door although her neighbour denies it.  Then Kate sees the child again but this time he is crying in the night and her reporter’s instincts refuse to be silenced. Her actions lead to her arrest and she is held for a full psychiatric assessment that involves raking in detail over the past she doesn’t want to face. Released with a restriction preventing her from returning to the street Kate opts to go back to Syria, but before she leaves she pays a visit to Sally and despite their many ongoing disagreements she begs Sally to keep an eye out for the little boy. From here on both sisters find themselves plunged into terrible danger.

The first half of the story skilfully intersperses details of Kate’s life and past as revealed through the psychiatric assessment interview, with the events of the week leading up to her arrest and her decision to return to Syria. The rest of the tale then develops the mystery of the little boy and reveals, as studies have shown, that children who witness domestic violence are more likely to be affected by violence as adults – either as victims or perpetrators.

At its heart this is a tale full of violence, darkness and illness, but it is also a tale of love and of survival. It is packaged as a thriller and it keeps its secrets right up to the terrifying dénouement. It’s a clever, complicated and well executed story with excellent character development and sound psychology behind it. This is Ellwood’s debut novel and she found inspiration for the themes in the experiences of her sister and her father, both of whom are journalists. I found it absorbing and disturbing and felt compelled to read it through in one day.

I give it 4 bites, a meal that leaves a bitter taste but I expect it to be a very popular dish.

 

Tamara Thomas
I am the only girl and youngest of four children, I grew up in a home stuffed with books, and now some fifty years later, great piles of them still appear in every room I inhabit. I won’t waste my time reading books that leave me feeling sour, dirty or depressed; books are a source of light and inspiration in my world. Nevertheless, I love a book that makes me cry with loss or sadness such as Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Book Thief. Bliss is a winter’s afternoon on the sofa, snuggled in with my dogs, stove blazing and an absorbing book.

Dear Amy by Helen Callaghan

imageMargot Lewis is a schoolteacher going through a divorce whose student Katie Brown has recently gone missing, but police are minimising the investigation as they suspect Katie’s run away rather than been abducted.

She’s also the agony aunt for The Cambridge Examiner where she gets her fair share of crank letters. But when she recieves one from Bethan Avery, a local girl that went missing years ago, saying she doesn’t know where she is and that she’s been kidnapped she feels compelled to pass it on to the police even though she’s sure it’s just a cruel hoax. Then more letters arrive, with information that was never made public. How is this happening?

I’ve not read a thriller in a fair few months but the premise of this was intriguing enough to make me sneak it onto my ‘To Be Read’ pile – how is she getting the letters out if she can’t get herself out? I knew they’d be some intriguing twists and turns.

I’m not keen on reading about any form of abuse so I am fussy about these kinds of books, only really picking them up if it seems like they’re not exploiting the idea of exploitation – always a difficult balancing act. Though there were undoubtably uncomfortable moments in this book I personally think the author treats this topic well. We know that violence including rape is perputrated by the kidnapper but it isn’t even described let alone used to titilate.

The psychologial twists in this are truly ingenius, I’m not sure whether some of the PTSD symptoms are accurate because they were described so believably I felt no need to put the book down and google – I really didn’t want to put the book down for anything though reading it in bed late at night did make me a bit scared!

I’m not an expert in this genre but this was an addictive read – 4 Bites!

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Girl With A Clock For A Heart by Peter Swanson

There were several things about this book that drew me in. The title- obvious comparisons with the Steig Larsson books, the cover- bold and a bit film noir-ish, and the description- promising intrigue and excitement:

tgwcfahGeorge Foss never thought he’d see her again, but on a late-August night in Boston, there she is, in his local bar, Jack’s Tavern.

When George first met her, she was an eighteen-year-old college freshman from Sweetgum, Florida. She and George became inseparable in their first fall semester, so George was devastated when he got the news that she had committed suicide over Christmas break. But, as he stood in the living room of the girl’s grieving parents, he realized the girl in the photo on their mantelpiece – the one who had committed suicide – was not his girlfriend. Later, he discovered the true identity of the girl he had loved – and of the things she may have done to escape her past.

Now, twenty years later, she’s back, and she’s telling George that he’s the only one who can help her…

So I was expecting great things. I was expecting to finish it in one go; I was expecting a twisty, exciting plot; I was expecting characters with flawed yet fascinating personalities and I was expecting a thrilling denouement…

I did not receive great things. I didn’t finish in one go; it took several reading sessions. It wasn’t especially exciting although was quite twisty. The characters were flat with no development and an annoying tendency to make unrealistic and outright stupid decisions. The denouement was either a last minute attempt to lay the groundwork for a series, or an example of an author getting totally bored with the story and ‘phoning in’ the ending.

The story plays out in two different times- when George and Liana/Audrey/Jane are at college and 20 years later when they meet again. Aside from the fact they are set in different locations, it is difficult to distinguish them- the voice of the character doesn’t change. There is no hint of development in the way they act or view the world- this is a huge problem considering the experiences the characters, especially George, go through in the intervening time.

The secondary characters are lifeless or unrealistic. The police characters do not act like the police and although they need to make the decisions they do in order make the story work, the fact that the police would never act like they do just makes it all messy and not a great read.

George in particular is not a good character- he is boring and he makes stupid unrealistic choices. Characters making stupid choices I can live with if the author has given them the right motivation for them. George’s motives and his choices do not align, and if I cannot believe in a character’s motivations for his choices, the character is not well written. There is no way that George would make the ridiculous decisions he does simply for the sake of the chance of being with a woman he last saw 20 years ago whom he KNOWS is wanted for criminal activities. He only went out with her for a couple of months. And she certainly isn’t written as an addictive femme fatale so it’s not that she’s just so marvellous he HAS to be with her. It just doesn’t make sense. And this, above all other flaws, is what makes this book so disappointing.

So… yeah. Not great things. Not even good things. Perhaps mediocre things…?

1 bite. Not recommended.

Rachel Brazil
Although well-known amongst my family for my habit of falling asleep with a book on my face, I’ve not let the constant face bruises deter me from indulging in my favourite pastime. There is no famine, only feast, in my house with every flavour of book available for consumption.

I’m happy to sample almost anything from the smorgasbord of literature available but can always be tempted with a juicy murder mystery or sweet little romance.

Maestra by L S Hilton

maestra_book_coverIt was bound to happen one day, a best seller written to a computer designed recipe. That’s how L.S Hiltons Maestra “The most shocking thriller of the year” comes across.

The recipe:-
Take lots of kinky sex, add copious amounts of designer shopping, half a dozen over ripe billionaire playgrounds, blend with super yachts, power and money. spice with murder and major art fraud, add a pinch of humour. Leave in a warm place to rise. If it doesn’t rise add more sex and a hedge fund or two.

The computer also says that you must grab the reader’s attention by getting in a torrid sex scene within the first fifty pages. The plot of Maestra didn’t allow for this, so instead the publishers put in a prologue which described three characters involved in a bizarre sex act. This prologue was so badly written that it was impossible to understand who was doing what, to whom and why. This seemingly irrelevant prologue turned out to be an extract from a sex scene which appeared later in the book. After reading it for a second time I was still none the wiser.

All novels are published with the intention of making money and it comes as no surprise that someone came up with the idea that “Fifty Shades of Grey”, but this time instead of EL James it should be written by a gifted and intelligent author, This would surely be a best seller. The author L.S Hilton fits the bill, formerly an historical biographer she is both gifted and intelligent, her writing (apart from the sex scenes) is often beautiful and the plot, involving the art world and money laundering, was well researched. Her knowlege of Italian art was impressive. As an artist myself, I was fascinated to learn about Agnolo Bronzino and Artemesia Gentileschi (I had to put the book down to look them up on Wikipedia).

The clever and convoluted plot moved along at a cracking pace. I read it in a day. Maestra has been described as a bonkbuster and as romp. To me it didn’t fit into either category, it was simply too dark, the anti-heroine Judith Rashleigh was too cold, calculating and cynical to earn any affection. Frankly I couldn’t have cared less if she lived or died.

The recipe lacked a few ounces of warmth and humour, they would have made all the difference. As it was I felt that Maestra was half baked.

Three Bites from me.

Jeff Short
I was born into a Forces family so naturally enjoyed Biggles as a child alongside Enid Blyton.
I fell in love with the Librarian at RAF Akrotiri and read and read so that i could see her every day. The book that I read there that had the greatest impact on me was Joseph Heller’s Catch 22 – set on an American airbase on a small island in the Mediterranean, and filled with military incompetence with black humour. I could never take service life seriously again.
I usually has three books on the go at any one time. Kindle, Audio and a proper book. My favourite genres are military memoirs and thrillers but being compulsive I’ll read anything.

The Sudden Appearance of Hope by Claire North

img_2276Hope Ardern has a very unusual problem, she can’t stay in anyone’s memory. If they turn away from her for just a few minutes it is like they’ve never seen her before and everything about their interactions have vanished from their minds.

It started when she was sixteen, schoolteachers not remembering she’d attended class, her friends forgetting to call her, her dad forgetting to drive her to school until her mother doesn’t remember her at all one morning when she comes down to breakfast and she has to pretend to be a friend staying over. That’s when she knows she has to leave and make her own way in the world, but it’s not so easy to get a job if people don’t remember you interviewing for it so she turns to crime. Stealing is easy when people forget to report you after all.

Stealing is how Hope gets caught up with the quest for “Perfection” – a new app that helps us mere mortals become as perfect as all those photo-shopped images we see everyday.  She’s hired to steal “Perfection” by someone that wants to destroy it, but “Perfection” could make her memorable.

Claire North’s The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August was the first book I reviewed for this site and I really enjoyed it, so when I saw this I knew I had to grab a copy! Like that I listened to the audio version of the book, a little longer than the last one at just over 16 hours but the premise sounded really intriguing.

Not a single minute of those 16+ hours was wasted! There’s so much in this book, so much that makes you think. From meditating on memory and the sadness of losing someone to Alzheimers to pondering the cult of perfection that seems to be taking over the world, this book will get you thinking. But it’s all wrapped up in such an intriguing story, and ironically Hope Ardern is a character you’ll never forget.

Claire North is one heck of a clever person and I think I’d like her as my new best friend. Anyone that can weave together the poetry of Byron and Wordsworth with the lyrics of The Macarena this skillfully deserves ALL the awards. And no, I’m not telling you what that’s about – read the book – you won’t regret it!

5 Bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Hidden People by Alison Littlewood

img_2254Albert Mirrells is a young city man striding into the future when he meets his young cousin from the Yorkshire at the Great Exhibition. Though at first inconvenienced by meeting the simple country girl he is soon beguiled by her teasing intelligence and her sweet song voice.

So years later when he hears that Pretty Lizzie Higgs is gone, burned to death on her own hearth and charged as a changeling by her own husband, he leaves his young wife in London and travels to Halfoak to look into her death. But superstitions are yet to be swept away by progress in this old nook of the world and he soon finds himself caught up in tales of the ‘Hidden People’ and struggling to find any rational explanations. Could the old folk tales be true?

There’s a quote that says easy reading is difficult writing and this book is totally true of that. I read it in one sitting, in about four or five hours, and then felt a little guilty as the author has clearly worked damn hard on this and it probably took a couple of years to write and rewrite. I have put it straight in my ‘re-readable’ pile though so hopefully that’ll give it more of the time it deserves in future.

Although it’s set in a summer that won’t end, this gothic grown up fairy-tale is ideal reading for autumn or winter nights too. There’s a blood-curdling mystery, an unreliable narrator, sullen villagers, folk songs, dandelion clocks, fabulous Yorkshire dialect counterpointing with formal Victorian speech, trains and fairies – I don’t really know what more you can ask for!

The author has skillfully woven traitorous threads and true together so you’re brain will be thinking ‘hang on a sec…’ several times throughout the narrative but unless you’re cleverer than me (which is possible I know!) you will still be surprised by the ending.

4 very satisfied Bites 😋

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Himself by Jess Kidd

Debut Novel
Debut Novel

Mahoney is a dark eyed, dark haired, leather jacketed lad down from Dublin for a holiday in the tranquil village of Mulderrig, or so he claims as he chats to Tadgh the publican.

His real reason for visiting is…well, rather more complex; raised by nuns in St Martha’s orphanage he’s just received an anonymous letter that was written at the time he was abandoned. Now he knows his mammy’s name, where she came from and even his own name – not that he’s intending to use it. He also knows she was considered the curse of the town. Among the many things he doesn’t know is what happened to her, why he was abandoned, who his father is and why, oh why, he can see ghosts.

With laughing eyes and a charming smile Mahoney attracts much interest and before a day has passed Tadgh has introduced him to half the town and found lodgings for the handsome stranger.

Up at Rathmore House young Shauna Burke is struggling to keep the fine old house going, her mother left years ago and her father took to his garden shed in grief where he reads about fairies and talks to himself in a Protestant accent. Her one paying guest is the ancient thespian Mrs Cauley, tiny in size, mighty in nature and comfortably wealthy she refuses to kowtow to the dogma of the local priest, Father Quinn. Recognising a kindred spirit in Mahoney the old woman takes him under her wing determined to help him find the truth about his mother.

Each year Mrs Cauley finances and stages a show in aid of the Church and this year SHE has decided it will be The Playboy of The Western World with Mahoney in the lead role. Under the guise of auditions Mrs Cauley sets to work asking questions that should have been asked twenty years earlier and uncovering a web of deceit so dark that it is surprising that the sun can ever again shine upon shameful Mulderig. Aided and abetted by ghosts, dreams and love struck women, Mahoney is kept busy following up the leads. Meanwhile with the troublesome priest doing his very best to bring down hell and damnation on the wicked stranger nature has decided it’s time to make its presence felt on the priest.

This book is an entire firework display of delights. The characters are spicy and gnarly despite some small town caricatures and by page thirty I was dreaming of Aidan Turner in the role of Mahoney with Maggie Smith as the force of nature that is Mrs Cauley. Engaging, humorous, dark and witty the dialogue crackled with spite and brilliance as small town secrets were revealed. The lilting Irish phrasing practically sang off the page while touches of magic realism combined to keep what is at its heart a dark and brutal tale from leaving a bitter taste.

I so enjoyed this book I want to read it all again immediately. It has to score a perfect 5 from me

Tamara Thomas
I am the only girl and youngest of four children, I grew up in a home stuffed with books, and now some fifty years later, great piles of them still appear in every room I inhabit. I won’t waste my time reading books that leave me feeling sour, dirty or depressed; books are a source of light and inspiration in my world. Nevertheless, I love a book that makes me cry with loss or sadness such as Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Book Thief. Bliss is a winter’s afternoon on the sofa, snuggled in with my dogs, stove blazing and an absorbing book.

Holding by Graham Norton

Temporary cover
Temporary cover

Set in Duneen, a sleepy, timeless Irish village this novel would be ideal for an audio book. It perfectly encapsulates the humorous, gossipy voice of Graham Norton as it tells the tale of a fat village guard who bumbles his way through the first real crime investigation that Duneen has ever seen. Guard Patrick James Collins is known to everyone as PJ and in the 15 years as Sergeant his job has largely involved issuing licenses and checking tax discs until one day a builder turns up some human bones on an old farm and PJ finally feels like a winner.

Up on the old Byrne farm the remains of a young man have been unearthed and speculation runs like wildfire through the village that it must be the body of Tommy Burke who vanished some twenty years ago. Suddenly old romances are dragged back into the light of day for handsome Tommy had been engaged to one girl and soft on another before his mysterious disappearance.

Set apart from the village live the spinster Ross sisters, Abigail, Florence and Evelyn. Their lives have been blighted with tragedy and loss and their family home, Ard Carraig, seems to attract sadness. Sweet Evelyn’s heart was broken beyond repair when Tommy vanished without a word.

On the other side of town lives Brid. Never an attractive girl she had lacked suitors until her father’s sudden death meant she inherited his farm. Then suddenly a stream of unattached young men with farming in mind arrive to court to the young woman. Amongst them was handsome Tommy and Brid had thought herself the luckiest girl alive when he proposed. Notice of the engagement was posted and the village buzzed with joy, until Evelyn, seething with jealousy and disappointment, launched herself at Brid in the middle of the street and the young women fought for their man. Oddly that was the same day that Tommy left town, the gossips had it that he was seen boarding the bus with a small suitcase and nothing had been seen of him since.

So this is the tangled web that PJ has to unravel and his investigations affect him as much as they affect those he must question. Unwittingly, gentle PJ finds himself caught up in the lives of the two very different women and in doing so discovers a new side to his nature.

Entertaining, skilfully layered and gently revealing of the characters’ flaws and foibles this is an engaging and cosy read. The language is full of imagery and I was surprised at how well the private thoughts and emotions of the characters were conveyed in just a few words e.g. “She felt transparent without the dark cloud of the past trapped inside her”. Each character was sufficiently developed and individual for the reader to get inside their psyche and sense for just a moment what it might feel like to be a fat, sweaty Guard or a lonely, heartbroken woman. That said it isn’t high literature but I thoroughly enjoyed it and would heartily recommend it to those who like Agatha Raisin, Miss Marple, or Midsomer Murder

 

Like buttery toast and a hot cup of tea when you’re home feeling poorly on a winter’s day. It rates 4 bites from me.

I received an advance copy of this book through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Bookeaters always say what they think. The hardback will be released on 6th October

Tamara Thomas
I am the only girl and youngest of four children, I grew up in a home stuffed with books, and now some fifty years later, great piles of them still appear in every room I inhabit. I won’t waste my time reading books that leave me feeling sour, dirty or depressed; books are a source of light and inspiration in my world. Nevertheless, I love a book that makes me cry with loss or sadness such as Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Book Thief. Bliss is a winter’s afternoon on the sofa, snuggled in with my dogs, stove blazing and an absorbing book.

13 Minutes by Sarah Pinborough

imageBecca isn’t quite sure why she’s at the hospital visiting Tasha, after all Tasha made it clear years ago that Becca wasn’t cool enough to be her friend. But she was dead for 13 minutes, and they did used to be best friends so she may as well just give her best at least.

Tasha doesn’t remember how she ended up in the icy water,  but she does know she wasn’t suicidal and she doesn’t think it wasn’t an accident either.  Her two best friends Hayley and Jenny are acting wierd since it happened. She’s grateful that at least this has led to making up with her old friend Becca.

But as the two teenagers try to find out what really happened their other friends are put at risk…

This is aimed at the Young Adult market (the older end, 15+ I’d say) but it can hold it’s own against most psychological thrillers.  There are twists and turns a-plenty and it’s difficult to trust your instincts when there are so many red herrings to slip on!

The story is told from both Becca’s point of view and from Tasha’s, and although the girls are very different both characters are believable as is their relationship. All the characters are well drawn, and if the ‘mean girl’ clique is a little cliche that is because so many people can relate to it. However there are sub-plots with adult characters and these show the authors ability to draw a variety of characters as well as emphasising the difficulty of being on the cusp of adulthood.

If you enjoy Pretty Little Liars then read this – it’s concise and pacy … and British!

4 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Shelter by Jung Yun

imageKyung Cho, a second generation Korean immigrant and his American wife Gillian live far beyond their means. Their lifestyle, and Kyung’s career is semi-supported by Kyung’s parents, Jin and Mae. But though they’ve given Kyung a privileged upbringing they never gave him love.

His father would beat his mother and she would beat Kyung.

Now he can hardly bear to see his parents, and resents the help they have given him. But when a shocking act of violence leaves Jin and Mae unable to live on their own he feels obliged to take them in. Suddenly he is forced to confront his past and his present.

This is a real nail-biter of a book, it may sound like a family drama or domestic noir but it goes further than that. There’s a real crime to be recovered from and solved, as well as an in-depth examination of the tensions of  being a second generation immigrant and clashing with your families culture and religion yet not quite fitting in with your own countries culture either.

I felt sorry for Kyung, but I also felt sorry for his wife Gillian and I could understand his parents. All of them mess up and make mistakes which hurt each other. This book looks at crime and punishment in all it’s forms and asks when rehabilitation is possible and what it takes to be forgiven both by society and those we hold dear.

4 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Even White Trash Zombies Get the Blues by Diana Rowland

imageOne of my favourite books is “Even Cowgirls Get The Blues” by Tom Robbins and a book challenge I’m participating in wants us to read a Zombie book so when my partner came home with a second-hand copy of this I knew it was fated!

If you’ve read Even Cowgirls Get The Blues then first I must tell you that besides the wink to the title there is no similarities between the two books. This is no awful parody like Pride and Prejudice and Zombies!

Angel Crawford is finally starting to get used to life as a brain-eating zombie, but her problems are far from over. Her felony record is coming back to haunt her, more zombie hunters are popping up, and she’s beginning to wonder if her hunky cop-boyfriend is involved with the zombie mafia. You read that right, there’s a zombie mafia!

This book isn’t high literature, but let’s be honest, if all books were high literature life would be pretty damn dull! And dull is definitely not what this book is! In fact it’s quite a clever genre-fusion.  With Angel working as a mortuary assistant she ends up in the middle of a lot of crime scenes. Though she dropped out of high school she’s far from stupid and finally having an opportunity to improve her ‘life’ is something she’s determined to seize.

This is the second book in a series but it can be read as a stand-alone, the back story gets told but without getting in the way of the current story. The characters are based in stereotypes which allows you to instantly recognise them but they’re not so stereotypical that they’re two-dimensional.

I read this pretty quickly, not because it was short but because it is a real page-turner.

Eat this not brains!

4 bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.