Ink and Bone (A Novel of The Great Library) by Rachel Caine

“You have ink in your blood, boy, and no help for it. Books will never be just a business to you.”

So my local library just launched an ebook service which is a) amazing, b) about blinkin’ time!
In the course of perusing the offerings of the library, I stumbled upon Ink and Bone by Rachel Caine. Now, I had heard of her as the author of the popular vampire series The Morganville Vampires, but I have never actually read any of them (still scarred by the travesty that is Twilight) but just look, LOOK, at the fabulous cover of this book.

LOOK at how beautiful this is!!
LOOK at how beautiful this is!!

 

It fascinated me.

It called to me.

It whispered in my ear promising that the words inside would match the elegant beauty of the pictures outside.

 

So I read the synopsis and that was it. I borrowed this book and the sequel and read them in one day. Both of them. I barely stopped to eat.
In the world of The Great Library, the 48AD fire that destroyed the library was stopped before much damage could be done. Instead of becoming a footnote in history, The Great Library of Alexandria grew in wealth and power and is now a separate country, a superpower that unquestionably holds sway over other countries in the world. Protected by its own standing army, The Library controls access to books and to knowledge. The Library and its daughter libraries around the world- the Serapeum- hold the original copies of books which are translated in the Archive by a form of alchemy only known to the Library and its Scholars. People who wish to read a book can request it from their Codex, a ‘blank’ book that will then translate (using the same alchemy) a copy of the book from the Archive. The Codexes and blanks reminded me very much of the concept of Ebooks but instead of electricity to power them and the internet to supply the books, we have alchemy.
As with all worlds where one institution holds the power over something, there is a thriving black market of book smugglers, a persistent Resistance in the Book Burners, and even an element of the perverse in the ink-lickers who take a very much socially unacceptable pleasure in literally eating the pages of the books they buy.
We are introduced to all this through Jess Brightwell. He is born into a family of successful book smugglers in London and spends his childhood ‘running’ books through the streets of London, avoiding the High Garda (armed forces of The Library), and delivering the original books to whoever has the moeny to pay for them.
He also loves books, and when his father, a man with little familial affection, recognises that is love for the books will interfere in his ability to run the family business he buys a place in the next class of Postulants- young people from around the world who travel t the Library in Alexandria and compete for a chance to be a library Scholar. The plan is for Jess to aid the family business from inside the Great Library machine.

What follows has been described as The Book Thief meets Harry Potter meets Farenheit 451 meets 1984 and although I feel  that does not accurately describe the book at all, I would be hard-pressed to come up with the words to do it justice.

What I can tell you is that the world-building is incredible. Just amazing. This world feels real, I can absolutely see this happening. Wales and England being at war? Plausible. France being conquered by the forces of the Library after a failed rebellion? Believeable. Automatons and Greek Fire used as weapons of war? Totally.
The care and attention that went not creating a plausible world has made this book into a something much more than a plain old alternative history. The subtle politics of the Library and their interactions with the rest of the world, the little changes in technology, the use of real historical locations- it all works.

As for the characters- it was refreshing that the main protagonist was male, this is so often not the case in YA books. Jess’s journey and character development is realistic and he isn’t irritating-not even when the love interest arrives.
The secondary characters are fairly well formed and fleshed out and actually there are at least three other characters who could have worked as primary protagonists- I suspect there may be a lot of fan fiction on the internet. The character most interesting to me is that Scholar Wolfe- his motivations are difficult to work out at first but as his back story is slowly revealed, he becomes more and more interesting (this continues into the sequel). I also liked a particular element of his story line, which I won’t spoil, that I wholeheartedly approved of in a YA novel.

I want to say a lot more about this book but I’m not supposed to write a dissertation for each review!
The central concept of this book, the world building and the insightful commentary on control of knowledge (which resonates more and more these days) make me recommend this book to everyone without reservation.

4 bites

 

Rachel Brazil
Although well-known amongst my family for my habit of falling asleep with a book on my face, I’ve not let the constant face bruises deter me from indulging in my favourite pastime. There is no famine, only feast, in my house with every flavour of book available for consumption.

I’m happy to sample almost anything from the smorgasbord of literature available but can always be tempted with a juicy murder mystery or sweet little romance.

The Watchmaker of Filigree Street by Natasha Pulley

the-watchmaker-of-filigree-street
Click here to order from Waterstones

Thaniel Steepleton is getting by rather than living. His job as a telegraphist at the Home Office earns him just enough to support his widowed sister but not enough for him to afford to pursue his love of music. Then one day he returns to his tiny flat to find a gold pocketwatch on his pillow. It isnt a birthday present from his sister but unfortunately he has no time to investigate further as a credible bomb threat has just come through.

When the watch saves Thaniel’s life in the threatened blast, he starts to investigate where it came from. His search leads him to its maker, Keita Mori – a gentle Japanese man whose seductive world of clockwork and music entrances him. Meanwhile, Grace Carrow will soon be making her entrance into his life but meanwhile she is sneaking into an Oxford library dressed as a man. A theoretical physicist, she is desperate to prove the existence of the luminiferous ether before her mother can force her to marry.

This blend of historical fiction and fantasy creates an enchanting steampunk-esque thriller. A character that can remember the future, one that can see sounds, the aforemantioned theoretical physicist, plus detectives from Scotland Yard, Japanese ambassadors, Irish nationalists and cameo appearances from Gilbert and Sullivan show what a talented writer Natasha Pulley is. Each character is utterly believable even if they barely grace the page.

The plot is intriguing but the author also adds in magical details like a clockwork Octopus with a penchant for stealing socks so there is never a dull moment. But these details are never just gratuitous. I can’t say any more than that or I’ll be guilty of spoilers!

One of the things that really sets this book aside though is the attention to sentence structure. That might sound like a very dry thing to say but when a book contains so many teeny tiny nibbles of pure bliss then the dish as a whole is definitely going to be tasty!

If you want some well-crafted escapism pick this up!

4 Bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Lost Hero by Rick Riordan

hooJason finds himself on a bus on the way to The Grand Canyon along with the rest of the ‘troubled’ kids of the Wilderness Camp- including his best friend Leo and his girlfriend Piper. The trouble is he has no recollection of them or of his life. He doesn’t have long to dwell on the matter though as almost immediately they are attacked by a storm spirit. Fending the storm spirit off results in Jason discovering he can fly… well, control the air currents… and gets them rescued by demi-god heroes from Camp Half-Blood. Shortly afterwards the three find themselves on a quest to rescue an imprisoned goddess, save the world and find out who they really are….

The first in a new series by award winning author Rick Riordan, this book is a spin off from the incredibly popular Percy Jackson books. Whilst it is not imperative to had read those before this, it would certainly help.

Riordan continues with his tried and tested formula of mingling the ancient Greek myths with the modern world creating an entertaining, if surreal, hidden world of cyclopes, satyrs, spirits of the air, and gods and goddesses, both minor and major, meddling in the lives of the children of the gods- the Heroes of Olympus.

As a piece of YA literature, The Lost Hero succeeds in its aims. It imparts life lessons and history lessons all wrapped up in a pacy and humorous tale. The jokes may not be flowing all the time but the melding of the old world and the new provides much to smile at. The ages of the demi-god protagonists provide teenaged angst to relate to in a clean and wholesome manner and the lines of good and evil are blurred just enough to make the characters well-rounded and interesting.

Although much older than the target audience, I have nonetheless enjoyed reading this and have actually read two of the four sequels in quick succession. I have enjoyed the pace of the story- it is episodic and yet still feels like the story flows naturally. The characters are distinctive and not too perfect despite the fact they are heroes!
I particularly enjoy the references to the Greek myths and legends and have actually been inspired to look up several of them to see what they originally were.

3 bites and a recommendation to teenagers everywhere to get a copy of these books.

 

Rachel Brazil
Although well-known amongst my family for my habit of falling asleep with a book on my face, I’ve not let the constant face bruises deter me from indulging in my favourite pastime. There is no famine, only feast, in my house with every flavour of book available for consumption.

I’m happy to sample almost anything from the smorgasbord of literature available but can always be tempted with a juicy murder mystery or sweet little romance.

Mr Rosenblum’s List by Natasha Solomons

Click for Waterstone's
Click for Waterstone’s

Tam’s second-hand bestsellers book finds…book #3

So here’s the Criteria:-

Each book must be bought secondhand for no more than £1

Each book must claim on its front cover that it is a bestseller

12 books – one per month for a year

Do feel free to join me and share your second-hand bestsellers in the comments!

Mr Rosenblum’s List

(Or friendly guidance for the aspiring Englishman)

by Natasha Solomons

 

Wow what a find – emblazoned with the banner “International Bestseller” and inside I find that this debut novel was translated into 9 languages. This was picked up for 99p so at the top end of my price range.

Solomons was inspired by her a pamphlet that was handed to her grandparents on their arrival in England as penniless immigrants. Jewish refugees fleeing from the fascist regime in Berlin were encouraged to make every effort to become British and to erase every trace of their Germanic antecedents. The pamphlet entitled “Useful Advice and Friendly Guidance for All Refugees” exhorted the refugees to refrain from “making themselves conspicuous by speaking loudly, nor by manner or dress.” It also offered such sage observations as “The Englishman greatly dislikes ostentation…he attaches great importance to modesty…(and my personal favourite) he values good manners far more than he values the evidence of wealth”

On arriving at Harwich dock in 1937 with other German Jewish refugees Jakob Rosenblum and his wife Sadie are handed a copy each of this leaflet and exhorted to study it with great care. In that instant Jakob believes that this flimsy piece of paper is indeed the key, the ultimate recipe for happiness, the rule book by which one could become an English gentleman.

Years pass and Jakob, now Jack, has lived faithfully by the guidance contained in that pamphlet, along the way he has added addendums and points of guidance based on his own acute observation. Furthermore he owns a thriving business, drives a Jaguar, even wears a Saville Row suit and his daughter has started her studies at Cambridge University, and yet, the ultimate badge of his Englishness is denied him. No matter how successful Jack Rosenblum maybe no English golf course will accept his application because he is Jewish. In a moment of inspiration Jack sees that his only way forward is to build his own course and so he sells their London home and buys a ramshackled cottage on a glorious Dorset hillside. The residents of the small village of Pursebury mock gently at this crazy man’s efforts and even unleash the mythical Dorset woolly-pig to try and drive him away, but slowly his utter determination and refusal to be beaten win him some grudging admirers and ultimately some true friends. From here on the book is a celebration of eccentricity and whimsy, the power of dreams and the beauty of the English countryside.

Given the current world climate the book is a stark reminder of the plight of refugees and the trials they face in trying to settle in a land and culture that is foreign to them. The book also shows that harmony is not achieved through living by a set of rules and that belonging is not about being the same as your neighbour. It’s charming, funny, whimsical and painful by turns and an absolute bargain at 99p.

5 bites, the description of Sadie’s Baumtorte process merits that!

Tamara Thomas
I am the only girl and youngest of four children, I grew up in a home stuffed with books, and now some fifty years later, great piles of them still appear in every room I inhabit. I won’t waste my time reading books that leave me feeling sour, dirty or depressed; books are a source of light and inspiration in my world. Nevertheless, I love a book that makes me cry with loss or sadness such as Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Book Thief. Bliss is a winter’s afternoon on the sofa, snuggled in with my dogs, stove blazing and an absorbing book.

The Motion of Puppets by Keith Donohue

img_2252Kay Harper is spending the summer as an acrobat in the Old City of Québec, her new husband Theo has decamped there with her and the two fall in love with the quaintness of the place. In particular Kay falls in love with a puppet in the window of the Quatre Mains, a toy shop that is never open.

One night, fearing she is being followed, she notices the lights of the toy shop are on and the door is open. She dives inside.

Theo wakes up curious at her absent, by evening it is clear that she’s missing. Searching for her he starts hanging around the circus and bonds with one of the workers. But the weeks drag on and he falls under police suspicion himself. Eventually he has to head home. Then his mother-in-law contacts him convinced she saw Kay on television and the quest to find her is back on – but it will stretch the limits of his sanity.

I’m a little bit at a loss for how to describe this book. It was a sensory feast, full of colours and shade, scents and seasons. But all overlaid with tension, despair and hope. There is a fantastical element to it but that never overtakes the sense of reality about it. The characters are varied but even the most unbelievable are believable.

It’s a fairly quick read, a little more body to it wouldn’t hurt but it’s not necessary. I can’t give it five bites because it didn’t make me question anything but I’ll definitely look out for more books by Keith Donohue!.

4 Bites

 

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

Dorian GrayYoung Dorian Gray infatuates everyone that meets him, such is his youthful charm and simple beauty. Artist Basil Hallward is equally as smitten and paints a full length portrait of him in gratitude for him being his muse. But while he is painting it Lord Henry Wotton,  a cynical and hedonistic aristocrat calls and Gray becomes fascinated by his opinion that beauty and sensual fulfilment are the only things worth pursuing in life. The thought of his own beauty fading horrifies Gray and he cries out wishing that his portrait could get old rather than him.

This work is incredibly well known, almost everyone has heard of it and knows the basic story even if they’ve never read it – that being so what is the point in actually reading it? Well of course the book goes further than the basic premise. Apart from the obvious exploration of societies obsession with youth and beauty, there’s quite a deep exploration of morality, though done with Wilde’s typically light and mocking touch.

The language in this is elegant but not overly formal (although if one more person had ‘flung’ themselves into a chair I might have screamed!) so it remains easily readable. The characters are believable and although they are not always likeable they do lead you through the story.

4 Bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami

imageToru Okada’s cat, oddly named after his wife’s brother who they don’t like, has disappeared. His wife is upset about this and as she is working and he isn’t she begs him to look for it.

This sets him on a journey where he will meet a succession of characters who all have their own stories. He is also being bothered by a woman who is phoning him claiming they know each other and making increasingly lewd suggestions.

As the story continues, normality gets snipped away at until it seems the pleasantly bland Okada has a much bigger purpose than anyone could have imagined.

I read this book first back in 1999 when I was pregnant and I was so taken with it I almost named my child after one of the characters! It’s a long book and kept me company many a night through a stressful time. Revisiting it has been strange to say the least, I saw it on audible and the idea of spending 26 hours in its company was more than I could resist.

The book is still good, Haruki Murakami has such an intimate and conversational tone to his writing and shares his characters idiosynchrocities in such an affectionate and humble manner that it is impossible not to care for them. Which is just as well as otherewise it really would be hard to spend 26 hours in the company of a man who is ostensibly looking for his cat!

Of course the plot does go further than that (no spoilers here though so you’ll have to read it if you want to know how!) and the stories of those he meets on his journey are fascinating and varied too.

I have to say that I wouldn’t recommend listening to this on audiobook. The reader was talented but several of the characters voices really grated on me, one of which was quite a prominant character so I spent far too long listening to her voice!

4 Bites

 

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Sudden Appearance of Hope by Claire North

img_2276Hope Ardern has a very unusual problem, she can’t stay in anyone’s memory. If they turn away from her for just a few minutes it is like they’ve never seen her before and everything about their interactions have vanished from their minds.

It started when she was sixteen, schoolteachers not remembering she’d attended class, her friends forgetting to call her, her dad forgetting to drive her to school until her mother doesn’t remember her at all one morning when she comes down to breakfast and she has to pretend to be a friend staying over. That’s when she knows she has to leave and make her own way in the world, but it’s not so easy to get a job if people don’t remember you interviewing for it so she turns to crime. Stealing is easy when people forget to report you after all.

Stealing is how Hope gets caught up with the quest for “Perfection” – a new app that helps us mere mortals become as perfect as all those photo-shopped images we see everyday.  She’s hired to steal “Perfection” by someone that wants to destroy it, but “Perfection” could make her memorable.

Claire North’s The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August was the first book I reviewed for this site and I really enjoyed it, so when I saw this I knew I had to grab a copy! Like that I listened to the audio version of the book, a little longer than the last one at just over 16 hours but the premise sounded really intriguing.

Not a single minute of those 16+ hours was wasted! There’s so much in this book, so much that makes you think. From meditating on memory and the sadness of losing someone to Alzheimers to pondering the cult of perfection that seems to be taking over the world, this book will get you thinking. But it’s all wrapped up in such an intriguing story, and ironically Hope Ardern is a character you’ll never forget.

Claire North is one heck of a clever person and I think I’d like her as my new best friend. Anyone that can weave together the poetry of Byron and Wordsworth with the lyrics of The Macarena this skillfully deserves ALL the awards. And no, I’m not telling you what that’s about – read the book – you won’t regret it!

5 Bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Hidden People by Alison Littlewood

img_2254Albert Mirrells is a young city man striding into the future when he meets his young cousin from the Yorkshire at the Great Exhibition. Though at first inconvenienced by meeting the simple country girl he is soon beguiled by her teasing intelligence and her sweet song voice.

So years later when he hears that Pretty Lizzie Higgs is gone, burned to death on her own hearth and charged as a changeling by her own husband, he leaves his young wife in London and travels to Halfoak to look into her death. But superstitions are yet to be swept away by progress in this old nook of the world and he soon finds himself caught up in tales of the ‘Hidden People’ and struggling to find any rational explanations. Could the old folk tales be true?

There’s a quote that says easy reading is difficult writing and this book is totally true of that. I read it in one sitting, in about four or five hours, and then felt a little guilty as the author has clearly worked damn hard on this and it probably took a couple of years to write and rewrite. I have put it straight in my ‘re-readable’ pile though so hopefully that’ll give it more of the time it deserves in future.

Although it’s set in a summer that won’t end, this gothic grown up fairy-tale is ideal reading for autumn or winter nights too. There’s a blood-curdling mystery, an unreliable narrator, sullen villagers, folk songs, dandelion clocks, fabulous Yorkshire dialect counterpointing with formal Victorian speech, trains and fairies – I don’t really know what more you can ask for!

The author has skillfully woven traitorous threads and true together so you’re brain will be thinking ‘hang on a sec…’ several times throughout the narrative but unless you’re cleverer than me (which is possible I know!) you will still be surprised by the ending.

4 very satisfied Bites 😋

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Hanging Tree by Ben Aaronovitch

Before continuing with this review, you might want to read the following disclaimers:
Firstly, this is the sixth book in Aaronovitch’s PC Grant series and although there are no spoilers for this book, there are for previous books (mild ones but even so). If you do not want to be spoiled, stop reading.
Secondly, I received an advance copy of this book for free in return for an honest review. And it is all entirely my own opinion.
Thirdly, you should probably be aware of my deep and abiding love for this series. It is far reaching and all-encompassing*. This review is inevitably coloured by this love and by the many months of anticipation leading up to it. Some people prefer reviews to be entirely objective. I have unashamedly written this review in the context of being an established fan. #justsaying

*Not that much of an exaggeration.

 

tht

There was much hyperventilating and excited squealing in my house last week. All from me…
My advanced copy of Ben Aaronovitch’s The Hanging Tree had arrived and the excitement levels had reached Def Con 1.

Fans of the Peter Grant series have been waiting many months for the sixth instalment- not helped by the repeated postponement of the release date- and inevitably some sequel anxiety had set in.
What is it wasn’t as good? What if Aaronovitch had run out of ideas? What if he’d written himself into a corner he couldn’t get out of? What if… what if… what if…

So it was with no small amount of trepidation that I began.

The Hanging Tree sees Peter enter the world of the super-rich after a party in one of the most expensive buildings in London, attended by Lady Ty’s daughter, ends in tragedy. Peter owes Lady Ty a favour and she’s calling it in.
Using his usual mix of proper police work, annoying his colleagues with his ‘weird Falcon stuff’, and asking the right questions at the right time he follows the investigation to a black market of arcane items, many of which interest the Folly greatly. Unfortunately for Peter, there are others who are also interested in the items… others who are not quite as keen on upholding the Queen’s Peace as he is…

I’ve read this book three times now. And fully intend on reading it again at the weekend.

To sum it up in a word- HOORAY!!!

There was no need for the sequel anxiety, no call for the trepidation- Ben Aaronovitch hasn’t lost his touch!
That’s not to say this book was perfect but I really enjoyed it and felt it was an excellent example of his writing skills.

The world that Aaronovitch has built over the series gets richer and more nuanced with every instalment- and I include the comic books in this- and some sub plots that have been weaved into the previous stories come to fruition without feeling rushed or shoe-horned in. Aaronovitch isn’t afraid to play the long game on this series and as a result there are many ‘no way!’, ‘blimey’ and ‘WTF?!!’ moments in this book as storylines and characters that have been waiting their turn suddenly get a chance to shine.

The plot cracks on at a very speedy pace and, as usual, twists and turns and doubles back until you end up at a place that you could never have predicted from the opening chapter but are very glad you’re there.

There were moments of high tension, moments of light relief and moments where I laughed my socks off. There are the usual geeky references, science/magic mashups, and the slightly dark, somewhat nonchalant humour that seeps into the prose, imbuing it with a perfect blend of comedy and drama. As a fan, there was an awful lot to keep me on side and happy.

The cast of characters is becoming more extensive every time and the additions here are worthy ones, be they brand spanking new or previously mentioned characters who now have an expanded role in the series.

Inevitably, this does mean there is less room for some of the other characters and I must admit that I did miss some of my favourites- the lack of much going on in the Folly itself was disappointing and I also wished that there had been more of Beverley. But you can’t have everything and what we did get was top notch!

 

4 bites for this excellent addition to the PC Grant canon! Read the whole series right now…

Rachel Brazil
Although well-known amongst my family for my habit of falling asleep with a book on my face, I’ve not let the constant face bruises deter me from indulging in my favourite pastime. There is no famine, only feast, in my house with every flavour of book available for consumption.

I’m happy to sample almost anything from the smorgasbord of literature available but can always be tempted with a juicy murder mystery or sweet little romance.

Himself by Jess Kidd

Debut Novel
Debut Novel

Mahoney is a dark eyed, dark haired, leather jacketed lad down from Dublin for a holiday in the tranquil village of Mulderrig, or so he claims as he chats to Tadgh the publican.

His real reason for visiting is…well, rather more complex; raised by nuns in St Martha’s orphanage he’s just received an anonymous letter that was written at the time he was abandoned. Now he knows his mammy’s name, where she came from and even his own name – not that he’s intending to use it. He also knows she was considered the curse of the town. Among the many things he doesn’t know is what happened to her, why he was abandoned, who his father is and why, oh why, he can see ghosts.

With laughing eyes and a charming smile Mahoney attracts much interest and before a day has passed Tadgh has introduced him to half the town and found lodgings for the handsome stranger.

Up at Rathmore House young Shauna Burke is struggling to keep the fine old house going, her mother left years ago and her father took to his garden shed in grief where he reads about fairies and talks to himself in a Protestant accent. Her one paying guest is the ancient thespian Mrs Cauley, tiny in size, mighty in nature and comfortably wealthy she refuses to kowtow to the dogma of the local priest, Father Quinn. Recognising a kindred spirit in Mahoney the old woman takes him under her wing determined to help him find the truth about his mother.

Each year Mrs Cauley finances and stages a show in aid of the Church and this year SHE has decided it will be The Playboy of The Western World with Mahoney in the lead role. Under the guise of auditions Mrs Cauley sets to work asking questions that should have been asked twenty years earlier and uncovering a web of deceit so dark that it is surprising that the sun can ever again shine upon shameful Mulderig. Aided and abetted by ghosts, dreams and love struck women, Mahoney is kept busy following up the leads. Meanwhile with the troublesome priest doing his very best to bring down hell and damnation on the wicked stranger nature has decided it’s time to make its presence felt on the priest.

This book is an entire firework display of delights. The characters are spicy and gnarly despite some small town caricatures and by page thirty I was dreaming of Aidan Turner in the role of Mahoney with Maggie Smith as the force of nature that is Mrs Cauley. Engaging, humorous, dark and witty the dialogue crackled with spite and brilliance as small town secrets were revealed. The lilting Irish phrasing practically sang off the page while touches of magic realism combined to keep what is at its heart a dark and brutal tale from leaving a bitter taste.

I so enjoyed this book I want to read it all again immediately. It has to score a perfect 5 from me

Tamara Thomas
I am the only girl and youngest of four children, I grew up in a home stuffed with books, and now some fifty years later, great piles of them still appear in every room I inhabit. I won’t waste my time reading books that leave me feeling sour, dirty or depressed; books are a source of light and inspiration in my world. Nevertheless, I love a book that makes me cry with loss or sadness such as Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Book Thief. Bliss is a winter’s afternoon on the sofa, snuggled in with my dogs, stove blazing and an absorbing book.

Taduno’s Song by Odafe Atogun

cover89737-medium-1Taduno is living a quiet almost dreamlike exile in the UK when a stained brown envelope arrives from his homeland. He knows at once that things are not right with the love he left behind and feels he has no choice but to return no matter the danger he may be in.
When he arrives home he finds that no-one recognises him, not his neighbours, not his girlfriends little brother nor anyone else. He was a famous singer whose face was everywhere so this is particularly odd.

He discovers his girlfriend Lela has been abducted by the government – to get her back he has to sing their praises but he has lost his voice as well as his identity. He must find both but lose his integrity to secure her release.

This is an unusual book, it deals with violent and corrupt oppression in a gentle and lyrical fashion. There’s a little magic realism thrown into the mix and it has a parable like quality to it.

The writing is good, the descriptions of the town he lives in in England is excellent so I felt drawn in straight away. His descriptions of his home are a little sketchier – it could be just that I found them harder to see as I’ve never been there though.

His characters are good as far as they go but my criticism of the book is that females are pretty much completely absent. Even his girlfriend who is more of an abstract figure who is used as a catalyst rather than a real living breathing human being. Though this does add to the fairytale like effect I do think it’s unnecessary and it ends up as a flaw.

The hero is a very likeable character and his dilemma and how he eventually deals with it makes sense. It isn’t an overly long book but you’ll enjoy the time you spend reading it.

4 Bites.

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Roofworld by Christopher Fowler

imageLondon in the 1980’s has a secret people never see. A refuge for the misfits and outcasts of society that towers above the dirty city. But Roofworld, with its complex laws and codes and decaying system of cables and wires is at war. And if evil wins it will take possession of the city below next.

Robert is looking for the author of a little known book to try and buy the film rights from her, sadly he is a little too late, she was murdered during a robbery the week before. But he does meet Rose, who tells him about her daughter who she thinks has been kidnapped and is being held in Roofworld. They get pulled into events up above – not always the perfect scenario for Robert as he  discovers he’s not good with heights!

This was Christopher Fowler’s first book – he’s gone on to become quite the prolific author having written more than 40 books including the ‘Bryant & May’ series. He specialises in unusual plots and peculiar happenings set in the real world so he’s a good bet for fans of Neil Gaiman and Ben Aaronovitch.

And this is certainly an unusual plot full or peculiar happenings! If I was rating this on plot alone it would definitely get 5 bites! If I was rating it  on writing alone it would probably get  bites too – even though he’s written so much this book was still peppered with lovely lines and fresh metaphors that made me feel like I was there.

The only thing this falls down on is the characters, they’re not awful, but they feel a bit lazy. Robert seems like a slightly less interesting version of Richard Mayhew – the protagonist of Neverwhere (written by Neil Gaiman in 1996 – though I’m not suggesting there was any plagiarism going on), Rose is cool but we never get beneath the surface and the police characters are very formulaic. The two dominant characters fighting it out on the roof tops could be fascinating but we don’t really get to learn much about them until too late.

I have to say that this would make a cracking movie though, or a graphic novel, but as a novel I can only give it 3.5 bites – readable, and fairly enjoyable but not earth-shattering. I’m interested to read some of his more recent works though now.

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Lost Time Accidents by John Wray

imageJohn Wray’s The Lost Time Accidents is an epic novel that follows the path of a the family of a man who seems to die just as he’s discovered time-travel. The final piece of the puzzle is lost with him but his sons believe they can replicate his experiments and find the secret themselves.

As the twentieth century develops and war breaks out in Europe one son leaves and travels to America, while his brother uses the prison camps to conduct more experiments.
Their story, and that of the rest of the family is told in a letter written by the great grandson ‘Waldy’ Tolliver to his lost love. He has plenty of time to write this letter as he seems to have been exiled from the flow of time himself. Can he find his way back and unmake his romantic mistakes?

Time travel will always be a popular narrative for novelists but this one is most inventive in its use. The past isn’t explored by time travel but bought back to life through family stories of  turn-of-the-century Viennese salons and how Einstein’s radical new theory stole their thunder, and reminisces about the golden age of post-war pulp science fiction and how they accidentally inspired a modern religion.

It isn’t until the last eighth or so of the book that we discover if the Nazi Waldy is named after really did discover time travel or not, and what that could mean for the world.

This is a big novel, but quite engrossing. It doesn’t suffer from a lack of editing, every word is either necessary to the plot or necessary to its beauty. It took me about a week to finish it so a good one for when you have regular reading time in your day, I imagine if you had to just read it at weekends it could get a little confusing.

4 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger

18619684The infinitely wise Neil Gaiman once said that “picking five favourite books is like picking the five body parts you’d most like not to lose.” My list of favourite books has been added to over time, novels which have influenced and shaped me have been added, whilst some I have re-read and found they no longer make the cut. However, this book will forever be in my top 5. Leave me on a desert island with only “The Time Traveler’s Wife,” and I won’t complain. Well I will- but more about the general situation rather than the choice of reading material.

Henry first meets Clare when he is 28 and she is 20. She is a stranger to him, but knows his name, has met him before. She tells him they knew each other when they were children and Henry gets the feeling that his future is rushing to meet him.

Clare first meets Henry when she is 6 and he is 36. In a meadow outside her family home, Clare stumbles across a man who tells Clare that he is a time traveller and that they are friends in the future. Understandably dubious, Clare refuses to believe him, until he disappears in front of her eyes.

What follows is a beautifully unusual love story. Henry is indeed a time traveller, a Chrono-Displaced Person. At moments of stress he disappears, landing in past or present, unable to take anything with him, not even clothes and with no control over where he is going. For Clare, Henry has always been in her life. For Henry, he still has all those moments to come.

My hardback copy of this book is one of my most treasured possessions. I’ve bought friends the paperback version over the years to avoid the pain of having to lend mine out. I’ve read it numerous times, but am writing this review because I listened to it recently on audible. It’s been a few years since I read it last, but it is still as special as it ever was. The writing is beautiful, from the descriptions of Clare waiting for Henry in the meadow, to small sentences of daily life. Every word seems to have been chosen with great care.

The whole thing would fall apart if the characters weren’t just right. Written from the first person, alternating between narration by Clare and Henry, we are part of their world. They are flawed enough to not be boring, but likeable enough that time in their heads is not a chore. It’s easy to care for them and to fear for them.

I have never been able to read this book without tears, and I hope I never do. It’s a testament to how good this book is. A fitting tribute to Clare and Henry.

5 bites

PS- Don’t bother with the film. It’s massively disappointing.

Kelly Turner
My love of reading began at an early age. I am indebted to my parents for putting “Naughty Amelia Jane” by Enid Blyton in the loft when I was five, forcing me to read something else. At the age of sixteen I picked up my first Discworld novel and never looked back. As well as devouring anything by Terry Pratchett I am also a fan of other fantasy writers such as Neil Gaiman and Ben Aaronovitch. In addition I like to read historical fiction, and enjoy a love story or two.

Some Kind of Fairy Tale by Graham Joyce

51iGDacIBML._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_Tara was fifteen when she vanished after an argument with her boyfriend. There wasn’t enough evidence to arrest him but her family never spoke to him again.

Now, 20 years later, Tara has just knocked on her parents door.  She’s  dirty and dishevelled, her father doesn’t recognise her at first but her mother faints at the sight of her.  They phone her brother Peter and together they hear her story of twenty years spent travelling the world, this epic journey was apparently taken on a whim.

But her stories don’t quite add up,  and she doesn’t look more than a day older than when she left. Eventually she tells Peter and her one time boyfriend Ritchie a different story – but one so strange her family fear she’s lost her mind.

I listened to this rather than read it, it was in fact the first audiobook I ever listened to (about 5 years ago) and listening to it again gave me a new appreciation of it. The reader is so important with an audiobook and John Lee was excellent! It’s mainly told from the male perspectives (Peter’s, Ritchie’s and excerpts from her psychiatrist’s book on her) and his voice was utterly believable throughout.

The story itself was far better and more nuanced than I remembered – and I remembered it fondly! The worlds the author builds and the characters that inhabit them are completely believable, whther they are set in the ‘real world’ or not! It’s a magical tale and deals with whether those of us that travel can ever truly come home as well as questioning the reality we take for granted.

5 bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Even White Trash Zombies Get the Blues by Diana Rowland

imageOne of my favourite books is “Even Cowgirls Get The Blues” by Tom Robbins and a book challenge I’m participating in wants us to read a Zombie book so when my partner came home with a second-hand copy of this I knew it was fated!

If you’ve read Even Cowgirls Get The Blues then first I must tell you that besides the wink to the title there is no similarities between the two books. This is no awful parody like Pride and Prejudice and Zombies!

Angel Crawford is finally starting to get used to life as a brain-eating zombie, but her problems are far from over. Her felony record is coming back to haunt her, more zombie hunters are popping up, and she’s beginning to wonder if her hunky cop-boyfriend is involved with the zombie mafia. You read that right, there’s a zombie mafia!

This book isn’t high literature, but let’s be honest, if all books were high literature life would be pretty damn dull! And dull is definitely not what this book is! In fact it’s quite a clever genre-fusion.  With Angel working as a mortuary assistant she ends up in the middle of a lot of crime scenes. Though she dropped out of high school she’s far from stupid and finally having an opportunity to improve her ‘life’ is something she’s determined to seize.

This is the second book in a series but it can be read as a stand-alone, the back story gets told but without getting in the way of the current story. The characters are based in stereotypes which allows you to instantly recognise them but they’re not so stereotypical that they’re two-dimensional.

I read this pretty quickly, not because it was short but because it is a real page-turner.

Eat this not brains!

4 bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Helium by Tim Earnshaw

2888525Gary has been drifting for a while, since his wife left him he’s been floating around the house he grew up in. The only thing keeping him rooted to the world is his shop. Once his love of music had been channeled in his band – ‘Gary Wilder and the Hi-Tones ‘, now he sells instruments to people that don’t remember his heyday.

Then he has a bad hair day, and strange things start happening. First he gets a date with the receptionist at his father’s nursing home, then Kent Treacy, acid casualty guitarist from the days when the Hi-Tones mutated into The High, turns up wanting to get the band back together for a reunion tour.

As the gravity of Gary’s situation deepens, or to be more accurate weakens, he sends a videotape to NASA. But will they believe their eyes?

This slim, lighthearted novel reads like a cross between Nick Hornby and an episode of the X Files. Although Gary is a bit of a loser these days, he’s someone who is still likeable enough that you want to follow him on his ridiculous journey. All the characters are more than a bit damaged actually, but believably so. That’s important because the plot is utterly unbelievable, without well-drawn characters reacting authentically this would have been too absurd to cope with.

But British authour Tim Earnshaw knows how to write, the setting descriptions are spot on – you really feel like you are right next to Gary, not just seeing what he sees but feeling the sun on the back of your neck too. So much so I was surprised at finding out the author is British!

There’s nothing life-changing in this book, but it’s a great little hollday or weekend read. Very entertaining! Pick it up and lighten up for a while!

4 Bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Fairy Wren by Ashley Capes

imagePaul Fisher is having a bit of a pants time, his wife left him and has just taken an injunction out to stop him contacting her, his bookshop is struggling to stay afloat and now greedy developers are threatening to put him completely out of business by raising the rents.

Then a fairy wren drops his lost wedding ring at his feet, and Paul discovers that there’s more magic in the world than he thought or he’s going completley mad.

Things don’t seem to improve for him though, punching the mayor seals his bookshop’s fate and although he’s met someone new, his wife has reappeared and she seems to be in some kind of trouble. His friends try to help but some of their suggestions are decidely dodgy and the blue fairy wrens clues are more confusing than clarifying.

Books about people that own book shops are always going to entice me – it’s pretty basic, I want to read about my dream life! Throw in a hint of magic and I’m definitely there. But although on the surface this seems like a light dreamy read it is quite a lot more grown up than that!

There is an ambiguity about whether the wren is real or the product of a deluded mind. After all, it’s very convenient how it’s implying he needs to help his ex-wife, a woman he’s still clearly in love with and wants back.   But then this protagonist isn’t self-absorbed, he has friends that have stuck by him and he’s doing what he can to help his fellow shop-keepers. Also there’s a new woman on the scene and she doesn’t seem like the type to hang around people that are obsessed with their ex and hallucinating. So maybe the wren is real? Maybe magic is real but doesn’t appear in ways we think it will.

I really enjoyed this book, it wasn’t what I was expecting at all, it was much cleverer and warmer and more realistic than I thought it would be. Which made it all the more magical.

5 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Wolf In The Attic by Paul Kearney

imageAnna Francis is almost 12, when she was younger she had a mother and a brother as well as her father. They all lived together in the most beautiful city in the world. Now it is 1929, her mother and brother are dead. She and her father live in a tall old house in Oxford and she just has her doll for company.

She sees a fight that ends in a murder, then she stumbles across a community of gypsies. One of their number guides her home but before long she finds herself searching for the gypsy community again. Looking for a new home and protection from an ancient evil that seems to be following her.

If you enjoy Philip Pullman’s writing there’s a damn good chance you’ll enjoy this. I was a little unsure at the very beginning – Anna’s voice seemed a little young to me and althouth this is a young adult book I worried it might be pitched a little younger than I had thought. That wouldn’t have made it a bad book by any means, but it would have made it a little less enjoyable for me!

But Anna’s voice, and the author’s writing settles into a richer, moe mature voice quite early and from then on I was hooked. The atmosphere of the setting is pervasive and the characters are magnetic. I would have read it in one sitting if I could, as it was I read it in two!

It’s not quite as masterfull as Philip Pullman, but well worth a read and I’ll be looking out for his next book! It would also translate well to screen – I can see it having a gorgeous steampunk styling!

4 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Returning Eden by Maria Mellins

imageThe fact that this book is described as a  “gothic ocean mystery” intrigued me straight away. Often we think of the sea as sparkling and sunshiny so this promised something that would embrace it’s depths rather than its shallows!

Eden and her family left the remote island of Cantillon, and her best friend Dylan, suddenly when she was just a child. But now she’s back and starting college much to the chagrin of her parents.

But just as she’s settling in and making new friends,  she escapes an attacker, then a corpse dressed as Dorothy from the Wizard of Oz, is found floating in the ocean.

Her new friends and Dylan help her investigate the mystery, scared that the killer will strike again. But as they do so they discover that Eden is at the centre of a dark and dangerous mystery – keeping her safe puts them all in peril!

I have to be honest, when I first started reading this I got a sinking feeling in my stomach and not because I was worried about the characters. It seemed to be aimed at a younger age group than I’d thought and the authors voice was a little clumsy. I stopped reading it and didn’t pick it up again until 2 weeks later.

When I did I wasn’t sure why I’d thought the writing was clumsy, and, rejoining the book after the chapters on Eden and Dylan’s childhood friendship, it was clearly aimed at those in their mid-teens upwards. I breathed a sigh of relief and settled in for a good read.

The author does a really good job of creating a perfect gothic atmosphere – misty, menacing and myopic. It’s balanced well by the teenage mood swings – optimism, melodrama and determination, and the story cracks on at a good pace.

If I was to be hypercritical I have to say the characters aren’t quite developed enough, but it seems this is the start of a series so that might be rectified in future novels.

I really liked the idea, it is different and I think a lot of those that read Young Adult books will appreciate that.

3.5 Bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Timeweaver’s Wager by Axel Blackwell

Click through to Amazon
Click through to Amazon

I can’t tell you how much I was looking forward to this second novel by Axel Blackwell as his debut novel Sisters of Sorrow blew me away so I was delighted to be sent an advance copy for independent review.

So what’s it all about? Well, as the title suggests there is an element of supernatural but much of the plot is rooted in American small city life.

Glen is a young man wracked with feelings of guilt and failure because he did not intervene to save his girlfriend from being raped and murdered seven years earlier. In his desperate attempts to assuage the guilt and find a way of bringing the perpetrators to justice he started a small project aimed at tackling violence. His endeavours caught the attention of Alan Fontain a wealthy and charismatic entrepreneur who poured money and other resources into it and became mentor, father figure and best friend to Glen. Under their partnership The Constance Salvatore Project grew into a highly successful program for the community with dramatic crime reducing outcomes; but for Glen the success of The Project merely served to emphasis his failings and isolates him from the memory of the Connie he loved.

With much of his life in limbo Glen lives in an apartment above his sister’s garage. Sophia was a registered nurse and partway through her year’s internship in a hospital when, just months after Connie’s death, a terrible car accident left her with a brain injury causing seizures and memory problems. Glen and Sophia find their lives irreparably changed by the events and look out for each other as best they can.

Stifled by the very success of the project Glen has told Alan that he needs to leave and find another way to make amends but Alan is more than reluctant to let him go. Finally Glen realises that he must take control of his future and he makes a public resignation at gala dinner thus forcing Alan’s hand.

The first third of the tale is basically the introduction to, and history of the characters that brings us to the point of Glen’s resignation. From here it takes on a very different atmosphere for this is where the Timeweaver and the wager come into it. Alan insists that before Glen leaves he listens to the truth about Alan’s own past and then he will be free to go. What Alan reveals has the power to change Glen’s life if he really wants it.

Who doesn’t have a conscience that pricks. How many of us have claimed that given a chance we would go back if we could and do something differently, display moral fibre, prevent something we knew to be wrong? So why didn’t we do it at the time? Perhaps we were really frightened, or selfish or maybe just embarrassed. How many of us would truly be prepared to lose everything we have, to go back and undo a wrong that we had allowed to happen. This is the extraordinary choice that is suddenly offered to Glen – go back, be fifteen again and die failing to protect Connie, or continue with the empty charade of his current life. I won’t spoil the plot, if you want to know the outcome you must read it for yourself.

So what did I think of it? I enjoyed the premise of the story and felt real warmth in the relationship between Glen and Sophia. I loved the idea of Samir’s wager with God and thought that the strands of the plot were brought together extremely well in the final third of the tale. But it felt very much like a three chapter book comprising the introduction, Alan’s story, Glen’s story. The novel is very short and I feel that too much of the story was told rather than experienced with the result that the first two thirds read more like extended notes or potted histories. In contrast the final third was excellent, I experienced the drama, the fear and the action and it really flowed. Overall my view is that The Timeweaver’s Wager had all the promise of Sisters of Sorrow but felt rushed and lacked the nurturing that it deserved.

3 Bites

Tamara Thomas
I am the only girl and youngest of four children, I grew up in a home stuffed with books, and now some fifty years later, great piles of them still appear in every room I inhabit. I won’t waste my time reading books that leave me feeling sour, dirty or depressed; books are a source of light and inspiration in my world. Nevertheless, I love a book that makes me cry with loss or sadness such as Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Book Thief. Bliss is a winter’s afternoon on the sofa, snuggled in with my dogs, stove blazing and an absorbing book.

The Trees by Ali Shaw

imageBefore I even start telling you about this book I have to say that I loved loved LOVED it! It is brilliant, stop wasting precious minutes here and go buy it now!

What? You need more persuading? Ok, so this is the story of Adrien Thomas. He’s been suffering from depression and a bit of a mid-life crisis and could easily be seen as a complete loser, his go-getting wife may well have got to the point where she’s going to go and get herself  a different life. But despite this there is something very appealing about Adrian. His honest truculence and determined wishy-washiness is somehow sympathetic.

Then one night, when his misery is compounded by his wife Michelle being away but eased by the joy of a Chinese takeaway, the trees come.

A fully formed forest explodes out of the earth and bursts through floors and walls destroying everything in their path. The devastation leaves death scattered all around and survivors terrified and confused.

Adrien meets hippie Hannah and her teenage son Seb amongst the survivors, at first he spurns their offer of help and friendship business until he realises that no help is coming. They set out to find Hannah’s forester brother, then he plans to go on to Ireland to see if his wife is still alive and still wants him. If he doesn’t chicken out that is.

As I might have already mentioned, I loved this book. The premise was brilliant and very well executed, the characters were all utterly believable and well nuanced and the twists and turns were clever.

If there is ever an apocalypse, I almost want it to be like this!

5 Bites

 

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Down Station by Simon Morden

imageMary is trying to stay out of trouble, mainly to prove she can. So she makes sure she’s not late for her shift picking up rubbish from the tracks of London Underground.

Nearby, young wannabe engineer Dalip, is struggling to replace loose rails with Stanislav and his gang. He’s determined to learn every aspect of rail engineering.

When the tunnel shakes and a ball of fire rampages through the Underground, Stanislav’s gang runs, so does Mary together with her colleagues. They join forces but not all of them make it through the service tunnel. Reaching a door, the fire not far behind them, they step through…and find themselves not on a London street but on a wild shore backed by cliffs and rolling grassland.

The way back is blocked. Making their way inland they meet a man dressed in a wolf’s cloak and with wolves by his side. He speaks English and has heard of a place called London – other people have arrived here down the ages – all escaping from certain and immediate death in London. None of them have ever managed to get back but apparently there is one survivor that holds the key to getting back and maybe to saving London. They set out to find this mysterious survivor completely unprepared for everything this new land has to throw at them.

Simon Morden is an acclompished Sci-Fi writer, he’s the author of the Metrozone series and is a bona fida rocket scientist (no really!). It’s small wonder then that this book engulfs you straight away and you feel it’s heat on your back long after you’ve finished it – much like that fireball in London he writes about!

He’s an excellent world-builder, his descriptions of London are just as good as those of the world he made up and that makes the new world very easy to buy into.

But I have to say what really did it for me were the characters. They are such a diverse bunch but completely naturally so, no matter they’re background they are all Londoners. As an ex-Londoner I appreciated seeing characters I know I would see everywhere in the city.  Even those that left London in previous times were believable and creatures of their own context.

I enjoyed the whole book – and I’ll definitely read more from him – including another in this series if he’s planning one!

4 bites.

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Madness and the Magic by Sheena Cundy

imageIn a typical English village a new vicar appears – and could be the very man to make local witch Minerva reconsider her single status.

But Minerva is a modern witch trying to deal with her menopause whilst trying to help her teenage daughter Rhiannon I middle her love life and the upset of an unexpected pregnancy.

The story moves between Minerva’s magical antics to seduce the vicar and Rhiannon’s emotional turmoil.  Both mother and daughter have to face up to changes in their lives, can magic save the day?

Although this is not likely to win a Pulitzer any time soon there’s a lot to be said for this novel. Firstly the characters are all endearing and people you could easily imagine in your own life. Secondly, it’s a book that looks at some serious stuff but never takes itself too seriously! There’s a fair bit of fun stirred into the cauldron here! Thirdly, it treats modern witchcraft fairly,  not implying that those that practice it are either sinister or crazy and sharing some of the roots and traditions of it and how they have been co-opted by Christianity – but still managing not to be preachy! And lastly, it’s not badly written!

I enjoyed my little sojourn in Minerva’s life though I was more drawn to Rhiannon and her struggles. I’d happily visit with them again.

It’s an easy read and an enjoyable one,  why not see if it casts the same spell on you?!

3.5 Bites!

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.