As I Descended by Robin Talley

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Click to Order from Waterstones

Power resides in all kinds of places these days so when Robin Talley decided to take Macbeth as inspiration the first thing she did was change the seat of power being vied for to an American High School.

Maria Lyon is one of her schools most popular students. But since she fell in love with her roommate Lily Boiten there are obstacles in her path that she never dreamed of. They can’t come out but if Maria can just win the Cawdor Kingsley Prize they’ll be assured the same college and four more years in a shared dorm room. But one thing stands in their way, Maria’s one-time friend and the most popular girl Delilah Dufrey. Lily and Maria are willing to do anything―absolutely anything―to unseat Delilah for the scholarship. They hold a seance together with Maria’s best friend Brandon but things get out of hand and before long feuds turn to fatalities, and madness begins to blur the distinction between what’s real and what’s imagined, the girls must attempt to put a stop to the chilling series of events they’ve accidentally set in motion.

I’ve read a fair few Shakespeare plots reimagined over the last couple of years and although most have been lit-fic – written by some of our greatest writers; don’t think that this one – written for the YA market by a fairly new (though already award winning) author can’t compete. It can and it does.

For a start, this isn’t a straight up re-write and some of the ways it honours the original are subtle and quite frankly a little twisty. There are no witches, instead she cast the three main characters in the fortune telling role through the seance, and there are plenty of other deviations too.

One of the other aspects I liked was the fact that there LGBT+ leading characters and that they weren’t some kind of freak show or tragedy device. Don’t get me wrong, awful things are done by and happen to these characters but awful things also happen to the straight characters. Not only that but the issues of being out or staying closeted are raised and stereotypes about LGBT+ people and drug-taking are circumvented. The characters are driven by deep and passionate loves but the fact that they are same gender in these cases is just a fact, it’s obvious that these characters could easily have been driven the same way if they were straight and there were obstacles to their happiness.

This is a great mix of psychological horror and waking drama with a big dollop of the supernatural stirred through it.

4 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Hit Book and The Sequel!

Rebel Of The SandsRebel of The Sands

This was a huge book last year. It’s cover taunted me from every book shop and it was all over our instagram feed too. It was a gorgeous cover too as you can see, chanelling Shaherazade’s magical stories and the mystic pull of the simmering desert nights.

The blurb was enticing too – but somehow never quite enough to pull me into buying the book there and then. It promised a “phenomenal novel packed with shooting contests, train robberies, festivals under the stars, powerful Djinni magic and an electrifying love story.

What more could I want? I’m not sure – if anything I maybe wanted a bit less! It sounded almost like a western crossed with a thousand and one nights and I wasn’t sure it would work.

But the next book is hitting the shelves tomorrow (with an equally lovely cover) and I got the chance to read them both via NetGalley – time to see what all the fuss is about!

So first off these are targetted at the teen / YA market. The first book starts with our hero Amani, desperate to escape the small town she’s been brought up in before her uncle can force her to become his next wife. Luckily she’s an amazing shot with a pistol so she dresses as a boy an attempts to hustle the prize money of a local shooting competition. But she has stiff competition in the form of a stranger to the town until they decide to join forces. What happens next leads to them racing out across the desert sands together – to start with at least. Amani wants to join her Aunt in the Sultan’s city but her new friend has other, even more dangerous plans.

I found I was turning the pages of this book really quickly and I was halfway through before I’d even realised that I’d started it properly! I’ll admit that I still wasn’t completely sold on the mix of Wild West and middle-eastern fantasy but there was so much action and drama that I got caught up anyway.

Slowly the characters started developing and by the end I was hooked. Then book two landed on my kindle…

IMG_2388Traitor to the Throne

It’s difficult to talk about this without giving too much away so suffice it to say that the adventures have led Amani to an exciting but perilous situation. Then she is kidnapped and sold to the Sultan and things get a whole lot more dangerous.

The second book is longer and to begin with I found it a little irksome. As with most sequels it spent a fair bit of time referring back to things in the previous book, useful if it’s been months since you read the first, but not for those of us that finished the first book only the previous day!

But after a hundred pages or so the story really got going. And the second book has a lot more moral meat in it than the first. Often second books can drift a bit or feel like they are full of filler material but not this one. This one is considerably more interesting than I’d expected.

4 Bites for each book … here’s hoping the last book lives up to them when it comes out!

 

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Ink and Bone (A Novel of The Great Library) by Rachel Caine

“You have ink in your blood, boy, and no help for it. Books will never be just a business to you.”

So my local library just launched an ebook service which is a) amazing, b) about blinkin’ time!
In the course of perusing the offerings of the library, I stumbled upon Ink and Bone by Rachel Caine. Now, I had heard of her as the author of the popular vampire series The Morganville Vampires, but I have never actually read any of them (still scarred by the travesty that is Twilight) but just look, LOOK, at the fabulous cover of this book.

LOOK at how beautiful this is!!
LOOK at how beautiful this is!!

 

It fascinated me.

It called to me.

It whispered in my ear promising that the words inside would match the elegant beauty of the pictures outside.

 

So I read the synopsis and that was it. I borrowed this book and the sequel and read them in one day. Both of them. I barely stopped to eat.
In the world of The Great Library, the 48AD fire that destroyed the library was stopped before much damage could be done. Instead of becoming a footnote in history, The Great Library of Alexandria grew in wealth and power and is now a separate country, a superpower that unquestionably holds sway over other countries in the world. Protected by its own standing army, The Library controls access to books and to knowledge. The Library and its daughter libraries around the world- the Serapeum- hold the original copies of books which are translated in the Archive by a form of alchemy only known to the Library and its Scholars. People who wish to read a book can request it from their Codex, a ‘blank’ book that will then translate (using the same alchemy) a copy of the book from the Archive. The Codexes and blanks reminded me very much of the concept of Ebooks but instead of electricity to power them and the internet to supply the books, we have alchemy.
As with all worlds where one institution holds the power over something, there is a thriving black market of book smugglers, a persistent Resistance in the Book Burners, and even an element of the perverse in the ink-lickers who take a very much socially unacceptable pleasure in literally eating the pages of the books they buy.
We are introduced to all this through Jess Brightwell. He is born into a family of successful book smugglers in London and spends his childhood ‘running’ books through the streets of London, avoiding the High Garda (armed forces of The Library), and delivering the original books to whoever has the moeny to pay for them.
He also loves books, and when his father, a man with little familial affection, recognises that is love for the books will interfere in his ability to run the family business he buys a place in the next class of Postulants- young people from around the world who travel t the Library in Alexandria and compete for a chance to be a library Scholar. The plan is for Jess to aid the family business from inside the Great Library machine.

What follows has been described as The Book Thief meets Harry Potter meets Farenheit 451 meets 1984 and although I feel  that does not accurately describe the book at all, I would be hard-pressed to come up with the words to do it justice.

What I can tell you is that the world-building is incredible. Just amazing. This world feels real, I can absolutely see this happening. Wales and England being at war? Plausible. France being conquered by the forces of the Library after a failed rebellion? Believeable. Automatons and Greek Fire used as weapons of war? Totally.
The care and attention that went not creating a plausible world has made this book into a something much more than a plain old alternative history. The subtle politics of the Library and their interactions with the rest of the world, the little changes in technology, the use of real historical locations- it all works.

As for the characters- it was refreshing that the main protagonist was male, this is so often not the case in YA books. Jess’s journey and character development is realistic and he isn’t irritating-not even when the love interest arrives.
The secondary characters are fairly well formed and fleshed out and actually there are at least three other characters who could have worked as primary protagonists- I suspect there may be a lot of fan fiction on the internet. The character most interesting to me is that Scholar Wolfe- his motivations are difficult to work out at first but as his back story is slowly revealed, he becomes more and more interesting (this continues into the sequel). I also liked a particular element of his story line, which I won’t spoil, that I wholeheartedly approved of in a YA novel.

I want to say a lot more about this book but I’m not supposed to write a dissertation for each review!
The central concept of this book, the world building and the insightful commentary on control of knowledge (which resonates more and more these days) make me recommend this book to everyone without reservation.

4 bites

 

Rachel Brazil
Although well-known amongst my family for my habit of falling asleep with a book on my face, I’ve not let the constant face bruises deter me from indulging in my favourite pastime. There is no famine, only feast, in my house with every flavour of book available for consumption.

I’m happy to sample almost anything from the smorgasbord of literature available but can always be tempted with a juicy murder mystery or sweet little romance.

Caraval by Stephanie Garber

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Click here to order from Waterstones

Scarlett Dragna is about to get married to a Count she has never met. That’s ok though, she’s hoping it will lead to safety for her and her sister away from her abusive father and the tiny isle of Trisda she has never once left.

But her sister Tella is determined to help her live a little and when an invitation arrives for them to visit the magical Caraval, a once-a-year, five-day performance where the audience participates in the show, she forces Scarlett’s hand so they have to go. But there’s a dark side to Caraval and although Scarlett has been told that everything that happens during Caraval is only an elaborate performance when Tella is kidnapped by the show’s mastermind organiser, she has to find her before the game is over, and her sister disappears forever.

This is billed as the perfect book for those that love The Night Circus, and honestly … it is!

It’s a little lighter and aimed more at Young Adults or at the fantasy market but the writing has some wonderful poetry to it. The world is absorbing and the characters are believable. If I wanted to be hypercritical I would say that the author could have dug deeper still into the motivations of the characters and fleshed them out even more.

That being said though I’d still thoroughly recommend it – it’ll bring a  flash of glorious colour to your winter nights!

4 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Lost Hero by Rick Riordan

hooJason finds himself on a bus on the way to The Grand Canyon along with the rest of the ‘troubled’ kids of the Wilderness Camp- including his best friend Leo and his girlfriend Piper. The trouble is he has no recollection of them or of his life. He doesn’t have long to dwell on the matter though as almost immediately they are attacked by a storm spirit. Fending the storm spirit off results in Jason discovering he can fly… well, control the air currents… and gets them rescued by demi-god heroes from Camp Half-Blood. Shortly afterwards the three find themselves on a quest to rescue an imprisoned goddess, save the world and find out who they really are….

The first in a new series by award winning author Rick Riordan, this book is a spin off from the incredibly popular Percy Jackson books. Whilst it is not imperative to had read those before this, it would certainly help.

Riordan continues with his tried and tested formula of mingling the ancient Greek myths with the modern world creating an entertaining, if surreal, hidden world of cyclopes, satyrs, spirits of the air, and gods and goddesses, both minor and major, meddling in the lives of the children of the gods- the Heroes of Olympus.

As a piece of YA literature, The Lost Hero succeeds in its aims. It imparts life lessons and history lessons all wrapped up in a pacy and humorous tale. The jokes may not be flowing all the time but the melding of the old world and the new provides much to smile at. The ages of the demi-god protagonists provide teenaged angst to relate to in a clean and wholesome manner and the lines of good and evil are blurred just enough to make the characters well-rounded and interesting.

Although much older than the target audience, I have nonetheless enjoyed reading this and have actually read two of the four sequels in quick succession. I have enjoyed the pace of the story- it is episodic and yet still feels like the story flows naturally. The characters are distinctive and not too perfect despite the fact they are heroes!
I particularly enjoy the references to the Greek myths and legends and have actually been inspired to look up several of them to see what they originally were.

3 bites and a recommendation to teenagers everywhere to get a copy of these books.

 

Rachel Brazil
Although well-known amongst my family for my habit of falling asleep with a book on my face, I’ve not let the constant face bruises deter me from indulging in my favourite pastime. There is no famine, only feast, in my house with every flavour of book available for consumption.

I’m happy to sample almost anything from the smorgasbord of literature available but can always be tempted with a juicy murder mystery or sweet little romance.

Empire of Storms by Sarah J Maas

There’s a certain difficulty reading the latest in a book series that you’ve been invested in from book one. Yes, you’re already predisposed to enjoying it; yes, you can slip back into the world and the characters easily; yes, you get the satisfaction of knowing what happens next to these fictional people that you’ve been hearing about, sometimes for years.
But you also risk the disappointment of the characters’ lives treading down a path you would not have sent them. You risk the annoyance of their character development turning them into someone unrecognisable. Most importantly, you risk the rage of the author taking all that beautiful world building, all that potential of kick-ass female characters, all of that realistic character development and throwing it away on an over-blown, over romanced, over-done MESS.

And, ladies and gentlemen, when that rage comes, it is a bitter one indeed….

eos-coverSarah J. Maas has been the recipient of two very positive reviews from me for the previous two installments in her Throne of Glass series (Heir of Fire and Queen of Shadows) and would have for the first three if The Bookeaters had been up and running then. So it is with much rage that I say Empire of Storms is not that good.

Picking up almost immediately where Queen of Shadows left off, we follow Aelin and her court on their journey back to Terrasen, Dorian in his recovery, Elide in her escape and Manon in her continued evolution from bad-ass and evil to bad-ass and not evil. Things happen and because of ‘reasons’* all the major characters end up in the same location embarking on a quest to find a McGuffin that will end the fight against darkness, restore balance to the world etc etc blah blah. To be honest, I forgot what they were doing half the time…

(* not entirely believable)

I do want to pick out some good points before I launch into what sparked the rage-

Manon Blackbeak, for the majority of her scenes, continued to be an amazing character- she’s fierce and determined, loyal to her Thirteen and sparked all of the out loud ‘WTF’ moments of the book. Her story line, right up to where it converges with Aelin’s, was the absolute highlight of this book.

Oh, erm, that is about it on good points… oh dear.

Moving on then, to the aspects of this book that enraged me:

The over blown writing – oh my goodness, someone take away Maas’s thesaurus immediately. I’m not sure what has gotten into her but the descriptive elements of this were over the top and very repetitive. Very repetitive. Very repetitive. Sorry, I’ll stop now…. except to tell you that they were very repetitive. Annoying isn’t it?

The excessive amounts of drama llamadom – I get it. This is an epic fantasy story but every. single. aspect. was the biggest deal in the history of big deals in a land where big deals were super-sized. Every fight was super-duper life threatening, every hint of danger was an immediate ‘oh no, we’re about to die horribly, the stakes have never been higher’, every victory was the most dramatic show of raw power ever, every conversation was heart felt and emotional and just. stop.

The romance-  one of the things I loved about previous installments was the move away from typical YA love triangle type first-love-is-last-love. So the fact that almost every character found their one true love (and all B/G too) was nauseating. WHY??? Why do they all have to pair up? Why do they all have to do it when they should be concentrating on saving the world?

The change in genre AKA god-awful sex scenes- Closely linked with the romance aspects is the fact that this title is decidedly not YA- it’s New Adult. The difference?  Explicit sex scenes. I’m not really against sex scenes in a book if that’s what character and plot call for but I do not think they have a place in a book series that started life as a Young Adult series. Particularly when they are so ridiculously badly written and are shoe-horned into a plot at the most unrealistic moments. Seriously…. Lovely lightening? Palm trees on fire? Invisible hands? And nibbling… so much nibbling! Concentrate on saving the world you idiots!

I could go on. I could tell you about the confusing POV switches, the lack of distinct character voices, the heroine who is an ABSOLUTE idiot but I can’t really be bothered. There’s only so much angry ranting a girl can do.

2 bites- 1 for sentiment and 1 for Manon.

Rachel Brazil
Although well-known amongst my family for my habit of falling asleep with a book on my face, I’ve not let the constant face bruises deter me from indulging in my favourite pastime. There is no famine, only feast, in my house with every flavour of book available for consumption.

I’m happy to sample almost anything from the smorgasbord of literature available but can always be tempted with a juicy murder mystery or sweet little romance.

Nevernight by Jay Kristoff

NevernightMia Covere is just ten when she watches her fathers execution.  For the next six years she is tutored in the arts of stealth, self-defence and murder but the day she takes her first life is the day she’s been waiting for.  Now she can become an apprentice in The Red Church, and, if she survives, earn the right to avenge all of those that killed her father.

But the apprenticeship at The Red Church is not her path alone and all those competing to complete it know they must face death many times over – even from each other’s hands. Luckily Mia has at least one friend, a not-quite cat made of shadow’s that drinks her fear.

This booked hooked me right from the start and I would totally recommend it to all lovers of fantasy. Jay Kristoff’s world-building skills are superb, I felt I knew where I was all the time I could so easily envisage all the settings.

This is the genre at it’s best, lots of action, menace and magic. It’s quite gory, there’s lot’s of death – it could probably give ‘Game of Thrones’ a run for it’s money! It has a strong female lead as well as a good gender balance throughout, the characters are interesting and well-developed too. The only thing I didn’t like about it was the fact I have to wait ages till the next book in the series comes out!

It’s not life-changing or overly thought-provoking but it will keep you thoroughly entertained!

4 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Power by Naomi Alderman

The PowerOne day, Allie discovers she can inflict an electric shock with just her hand. Her adoptive father, who has been sexually abusing her for years, finds himself on the recieivng end.

In the UK, Roxy Monke, daughter of crime lord Bernie Monke, finds she has the same power – but it’s not enough to save her mother from the men sent to kill her.

Soon after hundreds of teen girls find they have the same ability and that they can wake up the latent ability in their mothers and grandmothers. Suddenly – the world has changed and the power to hurt is in women’s hands.

To say my little feminist heart was excited to read this is an understatement! I couldn’t wait to see how this question would be examined and what conclusions this book would come to. But before we ge to that let’s just look at it as a story.

Naomi Alderman is a good writer. There are a couple of clever stylistic twists but mainly she just gets on with the job of telling the story so it flows very quickly and pulls the reader along … even when there are moments that you might not want to read or only to read through your fingers!

The characters are great, I particularly liked Tunde, the young Nigerian lad who falls into becoming THE expert journalist on the subject by chance but takes the opportunity and runs with it. But all the characters are well written and easy to empathise with.

That’s partly why I ended up not really liking this book. It’s powerful, but it’s message seems to suggest that power corrupts everybody. That if women were more physically powerful as men we’d abuse that power just as much.

It’s a theory that does have a certain amount of validity, but nonetheless it’s one that my heart can’t accept. It’s also one that I think is dangerous in the current climate. There are too many ‘mens rights activists’ that already think we’re in a war and that feminists all need a lesson. This could become ammunition for them. After all, most of them aren’t brilliant at distinguishing fiction from reality.

3 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

My Name is Leon by Kit de Waal

cover78296-mediumIt is 1981 and nine year old Leon has just gained a perfect baby brother called Jake. His mum is sleeping all the time but that’s ok because he’s learnt exactly how to look after Jake on his own, but then he runs out of money and asks his upstairs neighbour if he can borrow a pound. Before he knows what’s happening he and Jake have been taken to live with Maureen.

He teaches Maureen how to care for Jake but it doesn’t seem to matter because the social workers keep telling him that Jake would be better off if he were adopted. He can’t go with him, Jake is white and Leon is not.

Leon struggles to cope with his anger, but a new bike helps give him a sense of release. Then he finds a new friend Tufty, a grown-up who reminds him of his dad and teaches him gardening and politics at the same time. Of course he doesn’t let any of that distract him from his master plan of stealing enough coins so that one day he can rescue Jake and his mum.

This book is written in the first person narrative and Leon’s voice is utterly believable. It is reminiscent of To Kill A Mockingbird as it shows racism through the eyes of a child. However this book shows that through the eyes of a black child who is mainly brought up by white adults. This is shows the absurdity of racism in 1980’s very clearly and it is disturbing. I’m only 2 years older than Leon and as far as nostalgia goes this book had it all, the descriptions of settings, of how people lived, and the magic of Curly-Wurly’s is all spot on.

Leon has had his shell hardened by his experiences, but his centre is pure sweetness and it’s impossible not to love him. I was a little disappointed by the ending – it is the right ending for the book I think I just wish it hadn’t finished so soon, I wanted to stay in Leon’s life a lot longer.

Of course the racism shown in this story hasn’t been eradicated, but hopefully this hard-hitting yet charming tale will go some way towards wiping some more of it out.

5 Bites.

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

13 Minutes by Sarah Pinborough

imageBecca isn’t quite sure why she’s at the hospital visiting Tasha, after all Tasha made it clear years ago that Becca wasn’t cool enough to be her friend. But she was dead for 13 minutes, and they did used to be best friends so she may as well just give her best at least.

Tasha doesn’t remember how she ended up in the icy water,  but she does know she wasn’t suicidal and she doesn’t think it wasn’t an accident either.  Her two best friends Hayley and Jenny are acting wierd since it happened. She’s grateful that at least this has led to making up with her old friend Becca.

But as the two teenagers try to find out what really happened their other friends are put at risk…

This is aimed at the Young Adult market (the older end, 15+ I’d say) but it can hold it’s own against most psychological thrillers.  There are twists and turns a-plenty and it’s difficult to trust your instincts when there are so many red herrings to slip on!

The story is told from both Becca’s point of view and from Tasha’s, and although the girls are very different both characters are believable as is their relationship. All the characters are well drawn, and if the ‘mean girl’ clique is a little cliche that is because so many people can relate to it. However there are sub-plots with adult characters and these show the authors ability to draw a variety of characters as well as emphasising the difficulty of being on the cusp of adulthood.

If you enjoy Pretty Little Liars then read this – it’s concise and pacy … and British!

4 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Pottermore Presents… by JK Rowling

ppThere is usually much excitement and slight hysteria when JK Rowling releases Harry Potter books- midnight fancy dress parties, bookshop activities and huge media attention.  So it was a bit surprising at how low-key yesterday’s release of the three Pottermore Presents collections was. In comparison to the firework extravaganza of The Cursed Child only a few weeks ago, these three short reads were a bit of a damp squib (pun intended!)

And there is a reason for that… in my opinion at least!

pp2The three collections of information, biographies and short reads are mainly compiled from the content already to be found on the Pottermore website but with the addition of new writing from Rowling herself and promise to give extra insight and a new dimension to the existing Potter series.

pp3Short Stories from Hogwarts of Power, Politics and Pesky Poltergeists, Hogwarts: An Incomplete and Unreliable Guide and Short Stories from Hogwarts of Heroism, Hardship and Dangerous Hobbies cover a range of topics including PolyJuice Potion, Professor McGonagall, the Ministers for Magic, the Hogwarts Express, and Remus Lupin.
All in all, it sounds like three books of delight for any average Harry Potter fan…

So why am I strongly implying that there is the distinct aroma of damp squib hanging around these mini tomes of knowledge….?

Simply put, these three books contain very little in the way of new information and the vast majority of the writings can be found on the Pottermore website itself or, for the more motivated fan, in numerous interviews, web chats and Twitter posts with Rowling.

Yes the information that was included, and yes it was a delight to dip back into the Wizarding World of Harry Potter (I expect that’s trademarked somewhere!) but it feels a bit like cashing in to have released these books when they contain so little that is new and undiscovered. Given that the marketing of these books included substantial mentions of the ‘exclusive new content’, I feel a more appropriate phrase to use would have been ‘elusive new content’.
I have actually dropped my bite rating by two because of this- had the marketing information been more clear about the proportion of Pottermore content to new content, I would have been happier.

The content itself is well written, is interesting and really does help to enhance your understanding of some of the characters (although never those that are central to the stories!) and their motivations. It also really shows just how much world building JK Rowling did when she was writing- lists of Ministers for Magic, recipes for potions complete with why each ingredient was chosen, origins for even minor characters.

1 bite from me today- be honest, marketing people. That’s all we ask. (3 bites for content )

Rachel Brazil
Although well-known amongst my family for my habit of falling asleep with a book on my face, I’ve not let the constant face bruises deter me from indulging in my favourite pastime. There is no famine, only feast, in my house with every flavour of book available for consumption.

I’m happy to sample almost anything from the smorgasbord of literature available but can always be tempted with a juicy murder mystery or sweet little romance.

Star Sand by Roger Pulvers

imageIn the last months of World War 2, sixteen year old Hiromi sees a man on the beach at night about to shoot himself. He is rescued by another man and dragged into a cave.  When she follows to help she finds they are both army deserters—one American, one Japanese.

Though they should be enemies they bond instantly and  Hiromi, alone in the world herself, resolves to care for them. But when another joins them the dynamics are upset. Fatally.

Years later, three skeletons and a diary are found in the cave but it’s another 50 odd years before a young female university student notices something odd about the diary and finally solves the mystery of who died in that cave and who lived.

I was intrigued by the premise and more so because I’ve read very little fiction on Japan in the war. The beginning of the book, which is basically Hiromi’s diary is terrific. It’s well crafted, maybe a little too well-crafted to ring true as the diary of a 16 year old, but as it turns out that’s not a bad thing. The characters are immediate and vibrant and it’s easy to get caught up in their story.

But about thirds of the way through it switches voice to the modern day university student and her voice did not ring true to my ear. She sounded more like a sixteen year old than someone who must have been around 22 – and she most definetly did not sound like a university student.

It’s quite a short book, almost a novella, and I think more time spent with the characters in the cave, and a better university student (or a different device to show the plot twist altogether) would have served this much better.  In the end it all felt a bit rushed and slapdash, which is a shame as it starts as a lovely attempt to honour both the Japanese and the Americans that were dragged into World War 2.

3 Bites.

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

 

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy

cover87393-mediumWoman on the Edge of Time was first published 40-years ago, it became a classic, painting a picture of two possible futures and how even the most downtrodden could fight for the happier one. Connie Ramos, a Mexican American woman living in New York. Connie was once ambitious and determined, she started college, but then she had her dignity, her husband, and her child stolen. Finally they want to take her sanity – but does she still have it to steal?

Connie has recently been contacted by an envoy from the year 2137 who introduces her to a time where men and women are equal, the words he and she are obsolete having been replaced by the word per (short for person). All forms of sexuality are celebrated as are all racial genetics. It isn’t quite a perfect world, there are minor jealousies and tensions between lovers and a war still being fought on the outer boundaries, but to Connie it’s a revelation. Now she’s been unjustly committed to a mental institution, and they’re putting electrodes into her brain, when she tries to reach the future next it’s entirely different, a horrific place for women to live. Does Connie hold they key to which becomes our future and if so does she have the strength to turn it?

Today Ebury Publishing have released a 40th anniversary addition, a new generation get to meet Connie. I have to applaud them, they’re having a great month for feminist literature, just a couple of weeks ago they also released Shappi Khorshandi’s Nina is Not Ok and now this!

To my shame I missed this first time round, I don’t know how, I’ve read a lot of feminist literature but this passed me by. I’m so glad to have read it. I have to admit that when I first started it I was in a dark place and the first few pages with their bleak portrait of exploitation was more than I could take. I had to set it aside for a couple of weeks. If I’d known where it was going I wouldn’t have, just a few pages later it blossomed and it would have lifted me right out of the funk I was in.

I can’t express how much I loved this book – it’s definitely one I’ll re-read and one I want passionately for you to read too. This isn’t just a ‘feminist book’, it’s also a brilliantly written sci-fi classic. It’s interesting to read this with fresh eyes in 2016, still over a hundred years away from the two possible predicted futures, and see our progress towards them. When Marge Piercy wrote this the idea of wearing computers as watches or using gender neutral pronouns was pie-in-the-sky as was the thought of the majority of women having plastic surgery. Reading it now it seems like it could’ve been written just yesterday. We’ve still all got choices to make – which future will you fight for?

5 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Nina is Not OK by Shappi Khorsandi

image17-year-old Nina likes to party, even more since her boyfriend dumped her. So what if she doesn’t always remember what she did the night before? And who cares if sometimes she starts drinking earlier in the day? Nina’s exploits are legendary!

But then the talk about her turns darker and friendships are fracturing. Her family are away so even the shining light of her little sisters love feels dimmed. Nina is decidedly not ok.

Shappi Khorsandi is a talented comedian and I’m more than a little partial to her comedy. As she’s also president of the British Humanist Society I know she’s someone with a deep interest in and knowledge of human motivations. As you can imagine I was pretty excited to get a copy of this to review.

It exceeded my expectations. From the moment I started it I was hooked, it’s told in first person and Nina is someone you can imagine having as a friend. She’s easy to like even though she’s making some really big mistakes.

The story is darker than I expected, especially as it is aimed at the Young Adult market. (A word to the wise, there are some graphic scenes in here and I’d suggest it’s not suitable for most kids under the age of 15.) However it is very well constructed and spiked through with flashes of humour. Sometimes when a celebrity writes a book it reads as if it needs another edit or two – maybe the publishers have been too fawning or maybe the celebrity’s ego is too big to believe they need  help. This is not the case here, every word is as it should be.

5 Bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Mr Penumbra’s 24-hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

imageIt’s hard being a hip graphic designer in a Recession hit San Fransico. Clay Jannon has lost his job as an award winning web designer and a mixture of desperation and curiosity, has driven him into working the night shift at Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore.

Mr Penumbra is charming and affable and Clay quickly decide to use his marketing skills to attract more customers. The few the store has do come in regularly, but they never seem to buy anything. Instead these ‘members’ borrow bizarrely obscure volumes from the back of the store, and it seems that each book leads them to the next in a very specific order.

Intrigued, Clay embarks on a complex analysis of the customers’ behaviour, getting his friends and new girlfriend (a Google employee who found the store from his online advert!) to help him. But when Mr Penumbra discovers their investigations he sets them on a path to a far bigger secret.

Obviously it’s hard for a BookEater to resist a book set in a bookstore, it’s where we all dream of spending our time after all! Throw in a mystery that can be solved by reading books and it’ll take a lot to disappoint!  Thankfully the only thing that was really bad about this book was the protagonist’s name! I was grateful it was told in the first person so that I wasn’t confronted by it too much!

I subverted things a little by listening to this rather than reading it, and it works very well as an audiobook, the reader sounded right and I felt like I was hearing Clay’s story first-hand. It felt very natural, his friends and flat mates were completely believable which really helped ground the more fantastical elements.

What I loved most about this book though was how it mixed a love of modern tech with a love of old books. Often these two are set up in competition with each other (like in The Word Exchange by Alena Graedon) here they work collaboratively.

Definitely an enjoyable read for a book lover!

4 Bites

 

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Smoke by Dan Vyleta

imageThe next huge YA crossover book! Those adults that loved Philip Pullman’s writing and JK Rowling’s world creation will love this.

It opens with a quote from Dickens’s Dombey and Son: “Those who study the physical sciences, and bring them to bear upon the health of man, tell us that if the noxious particles that rise from vitiated air, were palpable to the sight, we should see them lowering in a dense black cloud above such haunts, and rolling slowly on to corrupt the better portions of a town. But if the moral pestilence that rises with them could be made discernible too, how terrible the revelation!”

This book, set in an alternative Victorian England takes that premise seriously. Here sin appears as smoke on the body and soot on the clothes. Children smoke furiously from birth and the ruling elite are sent to boarding school to learn to control their desires and contain their sin. They are spotless.

Thomas and Charlie attend such a school in Oxfordshire but then on a trip to London, a forbidden city shrouded in smoke and darkness, they witness an event that makes them question everything they have been told. There is more to the world of smoke, soot and ash than meets the eye and it seems there are those who will stop at nothing to protect it.

There are a lot of great Young Adult stories and many older adults read them too (you’re only as old as the books you read? 😉). But few of them have writing as good as this.  For the first few chapters I found myself stopping and re-reading many sentences, smiling to myself at the simple joy of language used well. But then I became too engrossed in the story and then the damn book went and finished!

I utterly recommend this, it’s got it all, plot, characters, ideas, adventure, love, passion and a great villain!

5 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Wolf In The Attic by Paul Kearney

imageAnna Francis is almost 12, when she was younger she had a mother and a brother as well as her father. They all lived together in the most beautiful city in the world. Now it is 1929, her mother and brother are dead. She and her father live in a tall old house in Oxford and she just has her doll for company.

She sees a fight that ends in a murder, then she stumbles across a community of gypsies. One of their number guides her home but before long she finds herself searching for the gypsy community again. Looking for a new home and protection from an ancient evil that seems to be following her.

If you enjoy Philip Pullman’s writing there’s a damn good chance you’ll enjoy this. I was a little unsure at the very beginning – Anna’s voice seemed a little young to me and althouth this is a young adult book I worried it might be pitched a little younger than I had thought. That wouldn’t have made it a bad book by any means, but it would have made it a little less enjoyable for me!

But Anna’s voice, and the author’s writing settles into a richer, moe mature voice quite early and from then on I was hooked. The atmosphere of the setting is pervasive and the characters are magnetic. I would have read it in one sitting if I could, as it was I read it in two!

It’s not quite as masterfull as Philip Pullman, but well worth a read and I’ll be looking out for his next book! It would also translate well to screen – I can see it having a gorgeous steampunk styling!

4 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Returning Eden by Maria Mellins

imageThe fact that this book is described as a  “gothic ocean mystery” intrigued me straight away. Often we think of the sea as sparkling and sunshiny so this promised something that would embrace it’s depths rather than its shallows!

Eden and her family left the remote island of Cantillon, and her best friend Dylan, suddenly when she was just a child. But now she’s back and starting college much to the chagrin of her parents.

But just as she’s settling in and making new friends,  she escapes an attacker, then a corpse dressed as Dorothy from the Wizard of Oz, is found floating in the ocean.

Her new friends and Dylan help her investigate the mystery, scared that the killer will strike again. But as they do so they discover that Eden is at the centre of a dark and dangerous mystery – keeping her safe puts them all in peril!

I have to be honest, when I first started reading this I got a sinking feeling in my stomach and not because I was worried about the characters. It seemed to be aimed at a younger age group than I’d thought and the authors voice was a little clumsy. I stopped reading it and didn’t pick it up again until 2 weeks later.

When I did I wasn’t sure why I’d thought the writing was clumsy, and, rejoining the book after the chapters on Eden and Dylan’s childhood friendship, it was clearly aimed at those in their mid-teens upwards. I breathed a sigh of relief and settled in for a good read.

The author does a really good job of creating a perfect gothic atmosphere – misty, menacing and myopic. It’s balanced well by the teenage mood swings – optimism, melodrama and determination, and the story cracks on at a good pace.

If I was to be hypercritical I have to say the characters aren’t quite developed enough, but it seems this is the start of a series so that might be rectified in future novels.

I really liked the idea, it is different and I think a lot of those that read Young Adult books will appreciate that.

3.5 Bites

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Burmese Days by George Orwell

imageGeorge Orwell’s first novel is set in 1920s imperial Burma, a place he knew well. U Po Kyin, a corrupt Burmese official wants to raise his standing with the white rulers. To do so he plans to destroy the reputation of the Indian Dr. Veraswami., friend of John Flory, an embittered  35-year-old teak merchant who both loves and hates Burma and the Burmese.

Flory would like to help his friend but he knows his own standing among his fellow Europeans is shaky. He has a ragged crescent of a birthmark on his face and his politics aren’t quite the thing. When he meets Elizabeth Lackersteen, He is immediately taken with her and they spend some time getting close, Lost in romantic fantasy, Flory imagines Elizabeth to be the sensitive non-racist he so much desires, the European woman who will “understand him and give him the companionship he needed.”

I chose this book partly because I loved 1984 so much when I read it recently,  and partly because my partner was about to leave to work in Burma (Myanmar as it’s known now) for 2 months. Call me soppy but I wanted to feel close to him while he was gone and so immersing myself in a book set where he was seemed like the ideal solution.

They say the past is another country and this book is set almost a century ago, lots has changed in Burma since then but somehow Orwell’s description of the country and climate still made me feel like I had a sense of being there with him. Not surprising when this book was based on his time spent there.

But this book did make me uncomfortable in other ways. The casual, ingrained racism of the white society is thrown into sharp relief. To think that this was my grandparents generation is sickening. What is as bad if not worse is seeing how Dr Veraswami internalises this racism and believes wholeheartedly that the white people are superior. It shows how damaging racism is and how hard it is for those subjected to it to push through it. The same of course applies to people subjected to sexism, homophobia, transphobia etc.

A powerful book, and one that shouldn’t be left in 1984’s shadows as it still has much to teach us.

5 bites

 

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Escape From The Past: The Duke’s Wrath by Annette Oppenlander

EFTP“When fifteen-year-old nerd and gamer Max Anderson thinks he’s sneaking a preview of an unpublished video game, he doesn’t realize that 1) He’s been chosen as a beta, an experimental test player. 2) He’s playing the ultimate history game, transporting him into the actual past: anywhere and anytime. And 3) Survival is optional: to return home he must decipher the game’s rules and complete its missions if he lives long enough. To fail means to stay in the past forever. Now Max is trapped in medieval Germany, unprepared and clueless. It is 1471 and he quickly learns that being an outcast may cost him his head. Especially after rescuing a beautiful peasant girl from a deadly infection and thus provoking sinister wannabe Duke Ott. Overnight he is dragged into a hornets’ nest of feuding lords who will stop at nothing to bring down the conjuring stranger in their midst.”

Now, I’m not a big gamer and I always play the few games I do on the easy or beginner mode. Having said that, if I chose the master level on a historical adventure computer game and found myself actually transported to the past, I do not think I would have coped as well as Max does. Yes he freaks out for a decent portion of the book, and yes he draws attention to himself for being weird (aka knowing about hygiene and other modern ideas!) but generally he does alright. At first. He finds food and shelter and a friend. And a girl. Then it goes…. less well. To say more would be ruining things.

It took me a while to get into this book and at first I put it down quite a lot. I can’t really pinpoint the reason why now that I’ve finished it because it is an exciting and realistic tale with a protagonist that is actually someone you want to root for. I think perhaps I would have liked to have seen Max in his real life more before he is transported to 1471. To jump pretty much straight into suspending my disbelief was a bit much- I would have liked the time to warm up to the concept.

Once Max is more thoroughly rooted in the story and more accepting of the idea that it isn’t really just a game, the story begins to fly by. Oppenlander is a gifted writer and her attention to the smallest details really allows her world to come to life. She has clearly done a hefty amount of research into this time period and even my finely-tuned ‘historical inaccuracies in fiction’ radar didn’t ping. The world that Max enters is the medieval world of the peasants- harsh, gruelling, relentless, unhygienic, smelly, really bloody hard! The realism of the world was a definite strength and helped to make what could have been a silly concept exciting.

Some of the characters were real historical people and there is an author’s note at the end to expand on this, and I think that this may have been the reason why some of the characters didn’t feel very well fleshed out. The highlight though is the character of Max. He feels very ‘teenagery’ but not in a cliched way. He just seems like you really could meet him on the street and he wouldn’t seem any different from any other teenager you may know. His trails and tribulations are pretty dire at times and you find yourself rooting for him all the way. This is not the type of book that could have worked with anything less than a strong protagonist.

Overall I thought this was a decent read. I think I perhaps would have enjoyed it a bit more had I been younger- given that this book is aimed at the YA market, I don’t consider this to be a criticism.

3 bites

Rachel Brazil
Although well-known amongst my family for my habit of falling asleep with a book on my face, I’ve not let the constant face bruises deter me from indulging in my favourite pastime. There is no famine, only feast, in my house with every flavour of book available for consumption.

I’m happy to sample almost anything from the smorgasbord of literature available but can always be tempted with a juicy murder mystery or sweet little romance.

The Painted Ocean By Gabriel Packard

imageThis story, told in the first person, begins with 11 year old Shruti’s father leaving her and her mother. Although she knows she should be devasted she admits that “secretly I preferred it without him, cos it meant I had my mum completely to myself, without having to share her with anyone. And I sort of inherited all the affection she used to give to my dad – like he’d left it behind for me as a gift, to say sorry for deserting me.”

It seems she needs all the maternal affection she can get as life at school is hard, as the only Asian she is bullied and friendless. Also her mother’s family are wrangling to get her to desert Shruti and remarry. Things couldn’t get much worse but Shruti isn’t one to give up too easily and tries everything she can think of to get her mother to stay.

Then Meena arrives at school, a fierce, self-determined girl that instantly takes her place at the top of the school hierarchy. She has a soft spot for Shruti though, and so begins a very lopsided friendship.

I’m not going to pull any punches with this review, this book bloody annoyed me. I feel betrayed by it. We all know that rubbish that you shouldn’t judge a book by it’s cover is impossible to live by, and cover designers and publishing houses sweat blood over getting a stunning cover that portrays something to the reader. They did well here, they produced a cover that sells, it even tells some of the truth about the plot, more than the blurb does. This cover, together with the title promises poetry inside, a story told so beautifully that it’ll break your heart three times over. But it isn’t and it doesn’t.

Instead you get a mess of a book that seems to want to be two very different things at the same time, characters that don’t act the way they should, and ridiculous, unexplained plot twists. Also the fact that Shruti’s voice doesn’t grow up at all even though she goes from an 11 year old to a grown woman is even more insulting.

To be fair, the first half of the book is fine. Not what the cover led me to expect but not bad at all. But once they head to University it all falls apart. I get the feeling that the author thought something more exciting and heartbreaking needed to happen so he hijacked their story, like a boy parachuting an action man into his sister’s game with her barbies.

Not impressed.

2 bites.

NB I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews.

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Ship by Antonia Honeywell

imageYoung Lalla is lucky. Although Oxford Street burned for three weeks under the new regime and British Museum’s artefacts are vanishing and being replaced by desperate homeless survivors, she has been sheltered from the harsh reality by her parents.

But with the regime getting harsher and food becoming more scarce her father has decided it is time to leave. The ship is not just a whispered dream, it’s real. But it can only carry five hundred people so only the worthy will be saved. To her surprise her father is the ships owner and the architect of the entire escape plan. He’s done it all to save her so her place is assured.  But before long she starts to question her place onboard, and the mission itself.

Antonia Honeywell has written a really interesting dystopian novel. Officially this falls into the Young Adult market but I think this is works just as well for the adult market.

It’s set in the quite near future and in a London that is recognisable and I think that adds to the credibility of plot. The main character is interesting and mostly likeable, but not perfect or omniscient, so it’s easy to stay on her side, even though you might sometimes want to shake her!

The purchase or the ship along with setting up stores for it and assembling the passengers isn’t focused on in the story, but that too is made believable by the telling of just a few details, the knowledge the reader is given of the surroundings chaos and by the character of Lalla’s father, if anyone can pull something like that off he is the man to do it!

This book doesn’t just tell a story though, it asks questions about how we live our lives, both in the world and personally. Questions that don’t have easy answers and the author doesn’t patronise us by providing her own.

4 Bites

NB I received a free copy of this book b through NetGalley in return for an honest review. The BookEaters always write honest reviews.

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

The Timeweaver’s Wager by Axel Blackwell

Click through to Amazon
Click through to Amazon

I can’t tell you how much I was looking forward to this second novel by Axel Blackwell as his debut novel Sisters of Sorrow blew me away so I was delighted to be sent an advance copy for independent review.

So what’s it all about? Well, as the title suggests there is an element of supernatural but much of the plot is rooted in American small city life.

Glen is a young man wracked with feelings of guilt and failure because he did not intervene to save his girlfriend from being raped and murdered seven years earlier. In his desperate attempts to assuage the guilt and find a way of bringing the perpetrators to justice he started a small project aimed at tackling violence. His endeavours caught the attention of Alan Fontain a wealthy and charismatic entrepreneur who poured money and other resources into it and became mentor, father figure and best friend to Glen. Under their partnership The Constance Salvatore Project grew into a highly successful program for the community with dramatic crime reducing outcomes; but for Glen the success of The Project merely served to emphasis his failings and isolates him from the memory of the Connie he loved.

With much of his life in limbo Glen lives in an apartment above his sister’s garage. Sophia was a registered nurse and partway through her year’s internship in a hospital when, just months after Connie’s death, a terrible car accident left her with a brain injury causing seizures and memory problems. Glen and Sophia find their lives irreparably changed by the events and look out for each other as best they can.

Stifled by the very success of the project Glen has told Alan that he needs to leave and find another way to make amends but Alan is more than reluctant to let him go. Finally Glen realises that he must take control of his future and he makes a public resignation at gala dinner thus forcing Alan’s hand.

The first third of the tale is basically the introduction to, and history of the characters that brings us to the point of Glen’s resignation. From here it takes on a very different atmosphere for this is where the Timeweaver and the wager come into it. Alan insists that before Glen leaves he listens to the truth about Alan’s own past and then he will be free to go. What Alan reveals has the power to change Glen’s life if he really wants it.

Who doesn’t have a conscience that pricks. How many of us have claimed that given a chance we would go back if we could and do something differently, display moral fibre, prevent something we knew to be wrong? So why didn’t we do it at the time? Perhaps we were really frightened, or selfish or maybe just embarrassed. How many of us would truly be prepared to lose everything we have, to go back and undo a wrong that we had allowed to happen. This is the extraordinary choice that is suddenly offered to Glen – go back, be fifteen again and die failing to protect Connie, or continue with the empty charade of his current life. I won’t spoil the plot, if you want to know the outcome you must read it for yourself.

So what did I think of it? I enjoyed the premise of the story and felt real warmth in the relationship between Glen and Sophia. I loved the idea of Samir’s wager with God and thought that the strands of the plot were brought together extremely well in the final third of the tale. But it felt very much like a three chapter book comprising the introduction, Alan’s story, Glen’s story. The novel is very short and I feel that too much of the story was told rather than experienced with the result that the first two thirds read more like extended notes or potted histories. In contrast the final third was excellent, I experienced the drama, the fear and the action and it really flowed. Overall my view is that The Timeweaver’s Wager had all the promise of Sisters of Sorrow but felt rushed and lacked the nurturing that it deserved.

3 Bites

Tamara Thomas
I am the only girl and youngest of four children, I grew up in a home stuffed with books, and now some fifty years later, great piles of them still appear in every room I inhabit. I won’t waste my time reading books that leave me feeling sour, dirty or depressed; books are a source of light and inspiration in my world. Nevertheless, I love a book that makes me cry with loss or sadness such as Captain Corelli’s Mandolin or The Book Thief. Bliss is a winter’s afternoon on the sofa, snuggled in with my dogs, stove blazing and an absorbing book.

The Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard

imageThis book, released in June last year is just all over our Instagram feed! It is so beloved so when I got offered a free copy to review I almost bit that hand that was feeding me I was so keen to see what all the fuss was about!

The Reds are serfs, ground down by extreme poverty and all desperately picking out the best lives they can from the scraps thrown them by the elite Silvers. But in this world it isn’t just wealth that makes the Silvers powerful, they each possess some kind of superhuman power, the ability to control water, or metal or maybe to read minds or even control them.

Mare Barrow is a Red, she can’t find work so she picks pockets to help support her family but soon she will be conscripted into the army as all u employed Reds are and forced to fight for the further enrichment of her Silver overloads. Then, in the nick of time, she gets a job in the Silver Palace and discovers very publicly that she possesses a deadly power of her own. The Silver King can’t just kill her so she is declared a long-lost Silver princess and engaged to the younger Silver prince so they can keep her close and under control. But Mare won’t be pacified by riches and starts helping  the Red Guard, a militant resistance group, hoping to bring down the Silver regime.

This book has elements of many popular YA books, there’s a little X-Men, a little Hunger Games, a little divergent, there’s also a bit of a love quadrangle going on so this book would have to be really badly written to have failed!

It isn’t the very best writing I’ve ever read if I’m completely honest, but it isn’t badly written at all. The mashing together of so many bits of popular YA books could have ended up being hard to stomach, but in fact have created a satisfying meal. Quite a more-ish morsel at that, which is just as well as the author is clearly savvy anough to know that most YA books work best if they have a sequel or more to follow. Hollywood loves a franchise after all. Book two – The Glass Sword – just came out a couple of weeks ago. I’ve had the pleasure of reading it already (thanks for the free copy of this too Orion!) and although I don’t want to say too much about it so that I don’t spoil it for you I will say that it does not disappoint. It takes the main characters through some savage challenges and I’m looking forward to the next in the series!

4 bites

 

 

GemBookEater
I was reading before I started school and I have no plans to stop now! I usually have at least two books on the go at once, one non-fiction and one fiction. I like reading books based in reality that flick open the doors to the mysteries of the heart or of the spirit.

Shadowmagic by John Lenahan

John Lenahan was a magician who was kicked out of the Magic Circle, and he had a couple of BBC TV shows, and was the voice of the toaster in Red Dwarf…. clearly it is the last of these that most inspired me to read the first of his Shadowmagic Trilogy, also called Shadowmagic.

SMIt tells the story of Conor, a normal teenager from Scranton in America. Well, if you consider ‘normal’ to come with a single father who lost his hand in a ‘lawnmower accident’ and who speaks to you in ancient Celtic languages and teaches you sword fighting. It quickly becomes apparent to Conor, and to us, that his life is far from normal when his Aunt (whom Conor didn’t know existed) literally appears out of nowhere, on horseback, and accompanied by two guards… and throws a spear at his head. One of the guards is then shot off his horse by a mysterious rider in black and as soon as he touches the floor he vanishes into a cloud of dust which, you know, sucks for him. It also sucks for Conor as his Aunt then vanishes (in a non-dusty way), his father suddenly appears throwing a battle axe at the rider in black and they both end up transported to a dungeon in a castle owned and run by Conor’s Uncle Cialtie (whom Conor also didn’t know existed). Yes Conor, you’re completely normal.

Described by the blurb as

“A Lord of the Rings for the 21st century. Only a lot shorter. And funnier. And completely different.”

this isn’t precisely an accurate description. Yes, it’s funnier than Lord of the Rings, and yes, it’s shorter, and yes it’s completely different but no, it’s not a Lord of the Rings for the 21st century. Admittedly it doesn’t actually try to be, and I doubt very much the author thinks that it is. It’s a book that doesn’t take itself seriously, and is unashamedly a romp.
Aimed at the young adult market, it actually has enough sophistication to appeal to older generations too. There is action, adventure, fantasy, a bit of history and some (clumsy) romance. A lot of the story is based on/inspired by ancient Celtic legends and I think this is where the Shadowmagic trilogy gets its ‘Percy Jackson but actually funny’ reputation. I actually found it a lot better than Percy Jackson, perhaps because John Lenahan wasn’t shoe horning in the legends into modern day life.

This isn’t high literature and this book isn’t going to change your life, but it will cheer you up on a rainy day!

3.5 bites

 

Rachel Brazil
Although well-known amongst my family for my habit of falling asleep with a book on my face, I’ve not let the constant face bruises deter me from indulging in my favourite pastime. There is no famine, only feast, in my house with every flavour of book available for consumption.

I’m happy to sample almost anything from the smorgasbord of literature available but can always be tempted with a juicy murder mystery or sweet little romance.